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Outdoor classroom experience offers students chance to learn about careers

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 By Kimberly Jett
Special to The News-Democtrat

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On May 15, the fourth grade class from Cartmell Elementary was given the opportunity to attend “Environmental Career Day” at the outdoor classroom on Four Mile Road.

With Carroll County students becoming college and career ready. the staff decided it would be a great opportunity for students to learn about different careers involving science and the environment. 

Students were able to rotate through seven different stations during the day. Each station had a guest speaker and a hands-on activity for students.

Thanks to donations from the Carroll County Soil Conservation Office and Scott’s located in Carrollton, one station included tree planting.  They also got to experiment with wind and solar power with volunteer Carolyn Bergs from the NEED (National Energy Education Development) project and Jon Nipple, the school district energy manager, and take soil samples with Theoda Franklin.  Christin Herbst from the Carroll County Extension office participated by talking to the students about her work at the extension office and allowing the students to plant flower seeds to take home.  Students also had the opportunity to become archeologists and sift through rocks and sediments in the creek to find fossils to then be identified. Sharon Spears from Dow Corning also spent the day talking to the students about her work at Dow Corning and her previous careers dealing with the environment. 

ऀThe students had a great day and the weather could not have been more perfect.  They learned about many different careers that they could someday pursue and got to spend some time outdoors in the process.  A lot of work went into this trip and it could not have been possible without help and donations from Dow Corning, Carroll County Soil Conservation Office, Scott’s, Carroll County Penitentiary, Carroll County Schools, station volunteers and a grant from the Kentucky Division of Conservation. This sows that when a community comes together to lend a hand, great things can come of it.