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Extension

  • Herbst warns, not all firewood is created equal

    Fires in the fireplace or outside in the fire pit are intrinsically connected to our visions of nestling in for a long comfy winter. Let the winter bring its ice and snow if it wants! Inside, we have a fire to snuggle up to.

  • Herbst: Horticultural oils are a safe option for insect control

    The winter months may not seem like the right time to eliminate pests the can take advantage of your landscape next spring, but many problematic pests spend the winter months on or near plants they plan to munch on when the weather turns warmer.

    A way to get an early handle on plant pests is to use horticultural oils specially formulated for pest control. Horticultural oils suffocate overwintering pests like scale, aphids, and certain mites.

  • Family and consumer sciences extension builds strong, healthy Kentuckians

    As an agent in Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, we work to give individuals the skills they need to improve the quality of life for themselves and their families. Throughout the year, we offer educational programs centered in areas that range from making healthy lifestyle choices to securing financial stability. In the past programming year, we have reached more than 1.6 million Kentuckians.

  • Leftover turkey talk

    The holidays are quickly approaching, and with them, the season of great eating. Soon, you’ll have more turkey and dressing than you’ll know what to do with.

    It’s a great idea to save your Thanksgiving leftovers, as it stretches your holiday food dollars and provides quick meals for your family. Leftovers must be stored and reheated safely to prevent foodborne illnesses. Follow these tips to ensure your leftovers are safe to eat:

  • Herbst says turkeys are a true North American bird

    Thanksgiving is upon us, and it is time to talk some turkey. Cathy can tell you all about cooking turkey, but let us chat about the bird itself, and its history, as we prepare it for the dinner table.

  • Herbst shares tips on how to prep roses for winter

    Roses are one of my favorite plants to see in a landscape. With the large variety of colors, forms, and fragrances, there is a rose suitable for every type of gardener.

    Last week, we focused on general landscape sanitation. This week, let us take a closer look at preparing our roses for winter.

    The level of winter protection needed depends on what type of rose is in the landscape: bush, hedge, or climber.

  • How to cook a country ham

    Thanksgiving is here but turkeys are not the only star of the show. Country ham is a regional delicacy that many of us enjoy but may not know how to properly prepare. Here are some tips and tricks to make country ham the star of your holiday dinner.

  • Let’s talk turkey safety this holiday

    It’s nearly Thanksgiving, and soon delicious, juicy turkeys will take center stage at many of our holiday meals. It’s so important that these birds are properly cooked and prepared, because we don’t want anyone to get sick from a food-borne illness.

  • Herbst discusses good landscape sanitation practices

    As we come to the end of the growing season, it is time to focus on landscape sanitation.

    Good sanitation practices can help reduce disease-causing pathogens. These organisms can survive for months or years on dead plant material or in soil, causing infections in subsequent years. Elimination of disease-causing organisms reduces the need for fungicides and can improve the effectiveness of disease management practices.

  • Jansen offers safety tips for heating your home

    The cold Kentucky winds are beginning to blow signaling that it’s time to turn on the furnace. Safety from fire and carbon monoxide poisoning should be your first priority.

    U.S. fire departments responded to thousands of home structure fires in 2016 that involved heating equipment, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Not only are furnaces potential hazards, but many of the fires started from space heaters. Carbon monoxide deaths were another problem.