• NRCS cost-share programs application due Oct. 31

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Kentucky is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial funding opportunities.

  • Clean up paper clutter

    Despite our best attempts at home organization, many of us are constantly bombarded with paper. Paper is the most common type of clutter. When you think about it, this is not really surprising considering the amount of junk mail, bills, coupons, completed schoolwork and publications that many of us have lying on tables or stuffed in drawers at our homes.

    You can get a handle on this type of clutter by following these tips:

  • Celebrating 4-H Week

    The Kentucky 4-H Foundation, along with 6 million 4-Her’s from across the Commonwealth and the country will be celebrating National 4-H Week Oct. 4-10.

    This year’s theme for National 4-H Week is 4-H Grows Here, the new National 4-H Campaign. 4-H grows confident, capable, and caring kids with the life skills to thrive in today’s world and succeed in their boldest dreams for tomorrow. Working in partnership with 110 universities, 4-H programs are research-backed and offer life-changing experiences to youth around the world.

  • State competition

    Carroll County 4H Shooting Sports had 20 students compete at the recent state shoot. They competed in shotgun trap, pistol, BP Percussion rifle, 22 sport rifle, 22 target rifle and the four archery disciplines. Top finishers for the weekend were Luke Heveline, BP percussion rifle for 9-11-year-olds, third place; Willie Pierce, target rifle for 12-14-year-olds, fourth place; John Glauber, shotgun trap for 12-14-year-olds, sixth place; and Kennedy Daigle, archery target for 9-11-year-olds, eighth place.

  • Herbst discusses fertilizer’s impact on alfalfa, potassium

    Last week, we focused on the importance of soil sampling and how this is the perfect time to test the soil for next year’s growing season.

    This week, let us continue the discussion about fertilizer in regards to alfalfa production and the uptake of potassium.

  • Become energy aware

    October is National Energy Awareness Month. This is an annual national effort to underscore energy’s importance to our prosperity, security and environment.

    Energy efficiency means performing the same job using less energy. New technologies and processes make this possible. Energy efficiency is the fastest and cheapest solution for reducing energy use, saving money and preventing greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Add apples to your diet

    Fall is known for its abundance of great, fresh foods, and apples are among the most popular. You can prepare apples in many different ways and include them as ingredients in main courses, side dishes and desserts.

    Not only are apples great additions to any meal, but they are also packed full of nutrients. They are low in calories, fat and sodium, cholesterol free and a great source of fiber. Apples also contain phytochemicals that may help prevent many chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease, asthma and diabetes.

  • Fall soil testing important for farmers

    With the first day of autumn, Sept. 23, now come and gone, it is a great time to think about taking soil samples for fertility analyses.

    Testing soil now allows plenty of time to follow fertility recommendations before planting season, which could end up saving time and money.

  • “Seniors Rock” at Point Park tonight

    The 2015 Carroll County Senior Event, “Seniors Rock” is Thursday, Sept. 17, at 4:30 p.m. at Point Park in downtown Carrollton. All seniors from Carroll and surrounding counties are invited to join in the festivities.       

    This year’s event will feature music from Madison Community Band, BBQ dinner, including dessert, games, giveaways, and door prizes from local establishments.

  • Southern corn rust infecting corn fields

    The pathogen of southern rust of corn (Puccinia polysora) has infected a lot of corn fields in Kentucky within the last month.