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Extension

  • Dry conditions lead to stress, damage to plants on area farms

    Recent weather patterns have resulted in dry conditions in many areas across the state. Water is an essential component to plant mass and is vital to growth, carbohydrate production, and nutrient transport. During periods of below-average rainfall or when rain distribution is uneven, plant health may decline.

  • Proper diet, exercise can help prevent, control diabetes

    Diabetes is a condition that affects the way the body uses energy. More than 29 million Americans are affected by diabetes and close to one-quarter of these individuals do not know they have the disease. An additional 86.1 million Americans have prediabetes.

    Many people believe they can prevent or control this disease by taking various dietary supplements, but that may not be the case.

  • Use food safety guidelines to help prepare holiday turkey

    Happy Thanksgiving! Soon, delicious and juicy turkeys will take center stage at many of our holiday meals. While we can already smell that good turkey cooking, it is so important that these birds are properly cooked and prepared, because we do not want anyone to get sick from a food-borne illness.

    It does not matter whether you purchase a fresh or frozen turkey. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has cooking safety tips for both on its Food Safety and Inspection Service website.

  • Planning can help make best use of feed this winter

    Dr. Roy Burris, UK Beef Extension Specialist, offers timely tips for cattle producers:

    Spring-calving herd

    Dry cows in good condition can use crop residues and lower quality hay now, but do not let them lose any more body condition. Save higher quality feed until calving time. Keep a good mineral supplement with vitamin A available.

    This has been a good year for fall pasture growth. Extend grazing for as long as possible to decrease the amount of stored feed needed.

  • 4-H helps youth develop skills for leadership, life

    Why is it important for young people to learn about leadership? How does it apply to life?

    Leadership is one of the core areas of focus for the Kentucky 4-H program, and as such, there are a wide variety of activities associated with leadership development in youth, appropriate for youth pre-4-H aged and up.

    The activities involved with leadership development vary greatly, but are all focused on improving the quality aspects of a young leader through reflection, explanation of leadership principle, and personal experiences.

  • Herbst enlightens readers with information on turkeys

    With Thanksgiving upon us, let’s talk turkey.

    Turkeys are raised only for meat. They are not raised for egg production, as with chickens, ducks and quail. As a result, turkeys do not produce very many eggs.

    There is only one breed of turkey, but with several varieties. The most common type of commercial turkey raised in the United States is the Broad-Breasted White. It has a larger breast than the other varieties of turkeys.

  • It’s time for country hams

    We’re getting to that time of year again for 4-H country ham projects.

    4-Hers who would like to participate in the country ham project must:

    • Be age 9-18 as of Jan. 1, 2017

    • Pay $60 fee to receive two (2) hams

    • Give a 3-5 minute presentation at the Ken-tucky State Fair on the required topic

    • Be available on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Jan. 16, 2017) to cure green hams

    Adults may also participate, but will be limited to one ham at $40 each.

  • Sanitation important for growing healthy plants

    As we come to the end of the growing season, it is time to focus on landscape sanitation.

    Good sanitation practices can help reduce disease-causing pathogens. These organisms can survive for months or years on dead plant material or in soil, causing infections in subsequent years. Elimination of disease-causing organisms reduces the need for fungicides and can improve the effectiveness of disease management practices.

  • Producers have options for poultry mortality disposal

    Following the tobacco buyout, the poultry industry has dramatically grown and is now Kentucky’s number one commodity. Backyard poultry has also surged in popularity.

    A common issue with any type of animal operation is disposal of mortalities. While dead animal pickup services exist for larger animals, this is not the case for poultry.  How do poultry producers dispose of mortalities?

    Producers need to dispose of poultry mortalities within 48 hours of the animal’s death, so consider having a plan in place before bringing poultry onto your farm.

  • Outstanding Youth | Sachleben