• Fall soil testing important for farmers

    With the first day of autumn, Sept. 23, now come and gone, it is a great time to think about taking soil samples for fertility analyses.

    Testing soil now allows plenty of time to follow fertility recommendations before planting season, which could end up saving time and money.

  • Add apples to your diet

    Fall is known for its abundance of great, fresh foods, and apples are among the most popular. You can prepare apples in many different ways and include them as ingredients in main courses, side dishes and desserts.

    Not only are apples great additions to any meal, but they are also packed full of nutrients. They are low in calories, fat and sodium, cholesterol free and a great source of fiber. Apples also contain phytochemicals that may help prevent many chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease, asthma and diabetes.

  • Herbst discusses fertilizer’s impact on alfalfa, potassium

    Last week, we focused on the importance of soil sampling and how this is the perfect time to test the soil for next year’s growing season.

    This week, let us continue the discussion about fertilizer in regards to alfalfa production and the uptake of potassium.

  • Become energy aware

    October is National Energy Awareness Month. This is an annual national effort to underscore energy’s importance to our prosperity, security and environment.

    Energy efficiency means performing the same job using less energy. New technologies and processes make this possible. Energy efficiency is the fastest and cheapest solution for reducing energy use, saving money and preventing greenhouse gas emissions.

  • State competition

    Carroll County 4H Shooting Sports had 20 students compete at the recent state shoot. They competed in shotgun trap, pistol, BP Percussion rifle, 22 sport rifle, 22 target rifle and the four archery disciplines. Top finishers for the weekend were Luke Heveline, BP percussion rifle for 9-11-year-olds, third place; Willie Pierce, target rifle for 12-14-year-olds, fourth place; John Glauber, shotgun trap for 12-14-year-olds, sixth place; and Kennedy Daigle, archery target for 9-11-year-olds, eighth place.

  • “Seniors Rock” at Point Park tonight

    The 2015 Carroll County Senior Event, “Seniors Rock” is Thursday, Sept. 17, at 4:30 p.m. at Point Park in downtown Carrollton. All seniors from Carroll and surrounding counties are invited to join in the festivities.       

    This year’s event will feature music from Madison Community Band, BBQ dinner, including dessert, games, giveaways, and door prizes from local establishments.

  • Southern corn rust infecting corn fields

    The pathogen of southern rust of corn (Puccinia polysora) has infected a lot of corn fields in Kentucky within the last month.

  • Useful tailgating tips

    The air is getting cooler and the leaves are changing color, signaling the beginning of fall and the start of football season in Kentucky.  With football comes tailgating. 

    Football fans love to gather in the stadium parking lot and set up the grill to cook and eat while discussing football strategies to win that big game.

    However, the excitement of the game is no excuse for forgetting about proper food handling procedures. 

  • Mulch leaves, yard waste this fall

    Now that Labor Day—the unofficial end of summer—has come to pass and we are experiencing a little bit of a cool down in temperatures, we now start thinking about the upcoming change of season.

    Fall is a beautiful time for gardens, but it can also be a messy time.  Tree leaves turn from green to vibrant fall colors and then drop, creating big piles.  The way we address our yard waste can have a significant impact on our gardens and on the environment.

  • Fall webworms have arrived; Parker wins at state fair

    Fall webworms are one of the three species of tent caterpillars we see in Kentucky.  These caterpillars live in groups within a silken tent, which helps provide protection for the caterpillars.

    FWW can feed on almost all shade, fruit and ornamental trees, with exception to evergreens. In Kentucky, FWW prefer American elm, maples, hickory and sweetgum.