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Extension

  • Angotti to retire from Extension service post Sept. 12

    I will be retiring from my position as your Carroll County Extension agent for family and consumer sciences on Sept. 12.

    I have enjoyed my position here and hope that I have helped individuals and families improve their lives. Since I came here 17 years ago as your Carroll County agent, I have found everyone gave me the utmost support and willingnewss to work together for the betterment of the community.

    I could not have asked for better people to work with and have made many wonderful friends that I will cherish forever.

  • Nitrogen could solve soybean crop problems in region

    University of Kentucky Extension Agronomist Dr. Chad Lee is encouraging producers across the state to closely examine their soybeans. Several soybeans have turned yellow in the past few weeks and further examination revealed little to no nodules.

    Nodules, located on the roots, are critical to soybeans because it is the bacteria living in the nodules that biologically fixate atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. Soybeans demand a high amount of nitrogen for production, and if the plant cannot fixate its own nitrogen, yields will be greatly decreased.

  • Carroll County sees growth in arts activities

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe Carroll County is experiencing its own sort of Renaissance. Not necessarily returning to Greek sculpture and Italianate Villas, but I do see signs of artistic interest.

    Main Street alone has two art studios, two dance studios, and one music studio. That’s five opportunities to learn something new. That’s in addition to the various festivals we have with artists and musicians displaying their talents and multiple programs in the local schools promoting the arts.

    What is “The Arts” anyway?

  • Local corn harvest could be reduced by lack of rainfall

    Lack of rainfall has put many corn producers in a bind across the state, forcing them to begin harvest before the normal time. 

    Early storage results in more days of warm, moist air before we reach the relatively secure air temperatures of 50 degrees or lower. This early harvest is compounded because the kernels are often still at very high moisture levels.

  • Mold, moisture can pose risks if left to grow in homes

    With all the rain we have been having, more moisture may build up inside your home from water damage due to leaks, condensation and increased humidity. 

    Molds produce tiny spores that travel through the air and either settle on surfaces to create new mold colonies or are inhaled creating allergic reactions or asthma in people.

    Molds can grow almost anywhere as long as moisture is present (including wood, paper, carpet and food).

  • Sports help children learn social skills, increase their fitness by getting active

    The beginning of a new school year is here.

    The new start provides an opportunity for your child to participate in all kinds of extracurricular activities, some of which include sports.

    Sports are a great way for your child to get active, gain confidence, make friends and learn life skills like responsibility and teamwork.

    If your child has never played sports or is transitioning to a new school, check the school’s website for the types of sports they offer and whether or not your child has to try out.

  • Workshop aids in controlling stormwater runoff during rain

    A Rain Garden Workshop will be held at the Carroll County Extension Office from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30. The cost for the class is $15.  The agenda for the workshop will include classroom-style material in the morning, lunch and hands-on building of the rain garden in the afternoon.

  • Take an active interest in your school-age child’s homework

    As a new school year starts, now is the time to develop some good habits to be the best supporter of your child’s learning that you can be.

    No, that doesn’t mean doing homework for your child. Here are some wise suggestions that help your child learn. By following these tips, you show your child that you are interested in helping him or her succeed in school and, in turn be successful throughout his entire life.

  • Sleep is important for success at school and work

    As our children return to school, this is a good time to discuss the importance of getting enough sleep.

    One of the most critical needs in helping youth and adults too, succeed in school, work, and just daily living is to get enough sleep. Although it may seem normal to some people when they do not get a full night of rest every night, over time, the lack of sleep can be harmful to their health. 

  • Use the right strategy to control yellow jackets, hornets

    European hornets, bald-faced hornets, and yellow jackets are intimidating creatures, and spend the summer searching plants for insects to capture and carry back to the nest as food for developing larvae.

    How-ever, most are not outwardly aggressive, and tend to stay within a few hundred feet of their nests. Aggressiveness can change quickly.  Movements toward the nest may provoke an aggressive defense.