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Extension

  • 4-H results from Ky. State Fair

    Where did the summer go? So many projects, so many meetings and so many activities that the time just flew by.

    The Kentucky State Fair just ended and Carroll County 4-H was well represented. Thirteen country ham members gave speeches and had their hams judged at the state fair on opening day. The next day, Andrea Searcy was there selling her items, as she is a member of the Entrepreneur club.

  • Late season caterpillar stings can be painful

    Late season caterpillars are out in full force. Many use camouflage or secretive behavior to avoid predators. In contrast, stinging caterpillars have brittle, hollow spines connected to venom glands. These spines easily penetrate and break off in the skin. Then, the irritating venom goes to work.

    Reactions to the chemicals vary from slight irritation to pustules, inflammation, and intense pain. Contact usually comes when a person accidentally brushes against a caterpillar that they did not see.

  • Create a nutrient management plan for manure

    Manure can be a valuable fertilizer, if used correctly. Having a nutrient management plan (NMP) can help you to understand how much manure your farm produces, to pinpoint what areas need manure and to identify crops that can best use the manure without losing nutrients via leaching or runoff.

    There are two types of NMPs, a Kentucky plan and a Comprehensive plan. You can write your own Kentucky Nutrient Management Plan. The UK publication ID-211, Kentucky Nutrient Management Planning Guidelines, is available to help create your own plan.

  • Timely tips provided for beef cattle producers

    Dr. Roy Burris, UK Beef Extension Professor, offers timely tips for beef cattle producers:

    Spring-Calving Cow Herd

    Fescue pastures do not generally produce much in August, however rain in July has given us some forage going into the usually dry months. Keep rotating pastures to permit calves to continue gaining weight. Keep minerals available at all times.

  • It’s not too late to plant a full-garden crop

    Although we are still a little over a month from the official start of autumn, now is the time to add some new plantings to extend your fresh produce well into the fall.

    Cooler nights later in the year can increase the sugar content of many crops and thus increase their quality. Cooler nights also slow growth, so crops can take longer to mature than in the summer. Keep this slower pace in mind when checking seeds for days to maturity.

  • Dealing with bullying

    It’s that time again to be excited about a new school year. It will be a year of learning and meeting new friends. However, being bullied can take away the excitement of going to school and cause the child to not do well.

    A new school year presents a great time for new beginnings and exciting expectations for what lies ahead. Unfortunately, bullying can make a new school year not so great if you are the victim.

  • Put pasture fly control measures in efffect during peak season

    Horn fly and face fly numbers affecting cattle will continue to build for a few weeks, which will put pressure on control programs. Now is a good time to evaluate the pasture fly situation in the herd.

    Check during the early afternoon on a sunny day. Less than 100 horn flies per side and less than 10 face flies per head is a good target for animal protection. Consider an adjustment or supplemental measure if fly numbers exceed these guidelines.

  • Patience necessary when storing hay to prevent overheating

    Prevent hay bale or barn fires by baling hay at appropriate moisture levels and monitoring temperature of recently baled hay.

    Generally, hay will begin a heating phase within one to two days after baling. During this time, you should monitor hay to make sure it does not reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion.

  • Homemaker volunteers give time worth $140,535
  • Eatin’ and Movin’

    Carroll County Extension hosted “Eatin’ and Movin’ at the Carroll County Public Library July 14. The children learned about nutrition and danced to burn off some calories. The program was a part of the library’s Summer Reading Program.