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Extension

  • Spring weather increase risk of hazardous thunderstorms

    In spring and summer, weather patterns are more active as they move through Kentucky,
    especially in the afternoon and evening, resulting in more thunderstorms.

    These weather conditions also increase the potential for lightning to strike people working or playing outdoors, and even while they are inside a building.

    All thunderstorms produce lightning.  Sometimes called “nature’s fireworks,” lightning is produced by the buildup and discharge of electrical energy between negatively and positively charged areas. 

  • Program, tour focus on home accessibility, universal design

    Would you like to learn ways to make spaces in your home easier for you, your family and friends to use? Do you wish it were easy to do? A special program on universal design, “Home Access-ibility ... Intro-duction to Universal Design and Home Tour” will be held Wednesday, May 22 at the Durr Annex of the Kenton County Cooperative Extension Service in Edgewood.

  • Whole grains: See if they pass the 3-step test

    Less than 5 percent of Americans consume the minimum recommended amount of whole grains.

    Although Ameri-cans generally eat enough total grains, most grains consumed are “refin-ed” grains rather than “whole” grains. Unfortunately, many refined grain foods are high in solid fats and added sugars.

    There is evidence that eating whole grains may reduce the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer (e.g., colon) as well as help control body weight.

  • Gun safety from Eddie the Eagle
  • Emerald Ash Borer has reached county

    The presence of the Emerald Ash Borer, a serious invasive pest of ash trees, has been confirmed in Carroll County.

    The Emerald Ash Borer can attack all species of ash in landscapes, forests and woodlots. The insect will attack stressed and healthy trees greater than about 1.5 inches in diameter.

  • Doggone fun
  • Horn, face fly control can increase farm’s cattle yield

    With the warmer weather upon us, we need to take a closer look at pests that can be bothersome to our cattle. 

    Horn flies and face flies are two of those pests.

    Both species breed in fresh pasture manure piles but present very different threats and management problems.  Fortunately, there are a variety of fly control options.

  • Extension Homemakers plan to ‘Stitch up a Memory’

    The Carroll County Extension Homemakers 2013 annual meeting will be held Tuesday, May 21 at 6 p.m. at the county Exten-sion office, 500 Floyd Drive in Carroll-ton.

    The meeting begins with dinner followed by a special program, installation of officers, a silent auction and awards.

    The program, “Stitch up a Memory” will bring back fond memories as members share earlier times as an Extension Homemaker member. Members should bring photos, handmade items, programs or anything other memories they wish to share.

  • More than 100 attend sewing expo held in Carrollton

    The Northern Kentucky and Louisville region Family and Consumer Sciences Cooperative Extension program hosted our eighth annual “It’s Sew Fine” Sewing Expo Tuesday and Wed-nesday, April 16 and 17 at General Butler State Resort Park here in Carrollton.

    About 100 sewing enthusiasts from the central region of the United States were in attendance. Instructors from as far away as New York, to Kentucky to nearby Indiana challenged participants to learn new sewing techniques.

  • Proper grazing techniques keep horses healthy, happy

    With pastures greening up well across the county, it is time to start planning ahead of summer pasture needs for your horses.

    Pasture provides a significant percentage of horses’ nutrient needs. Al- though horses have more grass than they can consume in the spring when moisture is adequate, the hot, dry conditions of summer greatly reduce available pasture.  Good management is the key to getting through this growth slump.