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Extension

  • Management practices can prevent soil compaction

    Soil compaction is a common problem that many producers face, but is often overlooked. 

    Significant soil compaction can reduce forage yields and slow forage establishment.  Manage-ment practices can be used to reduce and correct this problem while improving soil conditions.

  • Eating healthy through good choices helps well being

    Most of us eat three meals a day. We eat because food satisfies our taste buds. We eat because it is a social activity. We also eat because food is good for us.

    Eat-ing provides our body with energy so that we can breathe and function. It also has an impact on our overall health.

    Nutritious foods help us maintain a healthy body and protect us against various illnesses, disorders and chronic diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, dementia, type 2 diabetes, bone loss, cancer and anemia.

  • Grand champion

    TBA Georgina 4712 won grand champion female at the 2013 Kentucky Sweepstakes Show & Sale, March 1 in Louisville, Ky. Caleb Stephenson, Carrollton, Ky., consigned the April 2012 daughter of S A V Brave 8320. Doug Sherman, Laconia, Ind., evaluated the 45 entries. Photo by Chuck Grove, American Angus Association.

  • 4-H prepares for county fair

    It’s time to mark your calendars for the beginning of summer. June 7-15 will be the Carroll County Fair. 

    As I have mentioned several times, I am so excited to be the 4-H Youth Develop-ment Agent for Carroll County. I have been accepted by so many agencies and organizations that are so receiving of the programs that 4-H has to offer. 

  • Proper mowing is key to a healthy lawn year round

    With last week’s article focusing on spring fertilization of lawns, this week’s article will continue the discussion with mowing lawns.

    The first mowing, usually in late March, makes the lawn look spring-like and very attractive.  Subsequent regular mowing hardens the grass for drought and heat stresses later on. When the first clump of grass grows above the mowing height, mow, even if a lot of the yard does not need to be mowed yet.

  • Program to focus on need to care for the caregivers

    This Thursday, March 21 we are offering a special program, “Caring for the Caregiver” at 6 p.m. at the Extension office.

  • Application of nitrogen helps spring lawns begin to green up

    At the first sign of green grass in the spring, it is tempting to dust off the fertilizer spreader to apply nitrogen to the lawn.  If you applied nitrogen late last fall or winter there is no need to apply nitrogen this spring because the lawn already should be starting to green up.

    Applying nitrogen now also will make grass less heat and drought tolerant and cause more problems with weeds and diseases.  Weeds compete with grass for moisture and nutrients.

  • Foot care, shoes to be discussed by diabetes support group

    Do you have diabetes or a friend or family member with the disease? A special group, the It’s About You Diabetes Support Group, meets the third Thurs-day of the month at the Carroll County Exten-sion office for people like you.

    The next meeting is this Thursday, March 14, a program on the care of the feet and shoe selection.

    Ruth Kingkade, RN, a certified diabetes educator with Three Rivers District Health Department, will discuss the importance of proper care of the feet. Chuck Webster, owner of Webster Drugs, will discuss proper shoe selection.

  • COWS alert local residents of tornados

    Carroll County Emergency Management has the ability to notify residents and visitors of Carroll County in the event of a tornado sighting or tornado warning by means of the Community Outdoor Warning System, called COWS. The COWS are meant for just that, community outdoor warning. At this time Carroll County Emergency Management has a total of 19 COWS. The COWS are not intended for notification inside homes, stores or any other type of building/structure.

  • Horse college offered to area farmers

    The Northern Kentucky area counties participate in horse college—a four-week program that focuses on horse nutrition, horse health, facilities, tack, and many other horse-related topics.

    Dr. Bob Cole-man, Univer-sity of Kent-ucky equine Extension specialist, will lead the series.  Dr. Coleman will be physically present at the Boone County Extension Office, but his classes will be broadcasted live at the Gallatin County Extension Office, U.S. 42 West, Warsaw.