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Extension

  • Providing care for wild animals is dangerous, illegal

    Watching wildlife is a really fun and exciting activity. It can be very enjoyable to watch wildlife in their natural state in our surroundings. This time of year can be especially exciting because the young wild animals can be seen.

    If we are outside, we may come across young wild animals that appear to be abandoned or orphaned. The big question is what should we do about it?

    First and foremost, do not bring the animal in your home for care. This may be the worst thing you can do for these young animals.

  • Soil compaction can create problems in the garden

    Gardening season is in full force with the threat of frost now behind us.  Before the garden went in, we had soil on our minds with testing the soil for fertilizer and lime.  How-ever, now is also a good time to think about your soil.

    I have talked about soil compaction in cropland, but soil compaction also creates an unfriendly growing environment for garden plants. 

    It is a serious problem for many home gardeners.  Thankfully, it is relatively easy to prevent.

  • Friday is entry day for exhibits at Carroll County Fair

    The Carroll County Fair is June 7-15 and the Carroll County Cooper-ative Exten-sion Service is getting ready for it.

    We encourage all residents to exhibit items you have made, grown and created so we can showcase the wonderful talents of our Carroll County residents in the exhibit trailer and at the livestock shows. 

    The fair catalog providing all exhibit guidelines and rules is available at the Carroll County Extension Service office and The News-Democrat.

  • Local children make state competitions

     My, what a busy month. Where does the time go?  Carroll County Cooperative Extension was the host for the 4-H District 3 Variety Show and what a great program. 

    There were 10 contestants, seven from Kenton County, one from Pendle-ton County and two from Carroll County. The talent consisted of piano playing, violin, singing, guitar playing, tap dancing, and modern dancing.  Both of Carroll County’s contestants will go on to perform at the state fair in August. It is so wonderful to see our youth as they perform in front of an audience.

  • Pasture management can cut costs to feed animals

    Developing a grazing management plan for your pastures is a critical practice for livestock producers because pasture is the most economical and efficient way to feed your animals.

    The first step in developing a grazing plan is to identify the forage species in your pastures.  During most of the spring and fall in Kentucky, we find cool-season grasses along with some legumes.  The following descriptions are those forages we see most often:

  • There are many great summertime activities on tap

    We invite all interested Carroll County youth and adults to enter exhibits at the 2013 Carroll County Fair.

    Fair catalogs are available at the Carroll County Exten-sion office, The News-Demo-crat office and other locations around town. Fair entries will be accepted Friday, June 7, from 9 a.m. until noon at the exhibit trailer just inside the fairgrounds. Items must be handcrafted, homemade, or grown by the exhibitor this past year.

    Adults must enter in the open class division and youth may enter in the 4-H or some of the open-class categories.

  • Insecticides can help win battle with carpenter bees

    Have you noticed the presence of carpenter bees around your home lately?

    These beneficial pollinators can be intimidating.  They are relatively large in size and can cause considerable structural damage over time.

    Carp-enter bees spend the winter as adults in their gallery homes.  Now, they are starting new tunnels or expanding old ones in order to raise a brood of about six larvae during the summer.  Accumulations of sawdust may be the first sign that their work has begun.

  • Tasty Travels Across America program offered May 30

    Northern Kentucky Extension agents for family and consumer sciences present a program featuring favorite foods from states all across the country Wednesday, May 30.

    The program is offered twice that day — noon to 1:30 pm and 6-7:30 p.m.

    Due to the success of this program last year, agents are inviting farmers market vendors, food service personnel and FCS educators.

  • 4-Hers get sewing experience, then model their wares
  • Spring weather increase risk of hazardous thunderstorms

    In spring and summer, weather patterns are more active as they move through Kentucky,
    especially in the afternoon and evening, resulting in more thunderstorms.

    These weather conditions also increase the potential for lightning to strike people working or playing outdoors, and even while they are inside a building.

    All thunderstorms produce lightning.  Sometimes called “nature’s fireworks,” lightning is produced by the buildup and discharge of electrical energy between negatively and positively charged areas.