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Extension

  • Pasture management can cut costs to feed animals

    Developing a grazing management plan for your pastures is a critical practice for livestock producers because pasture is the most economical and efficient way to feed your animals.

    The first step in developing a grazing plan is to identify the forage species in your pastures.  During most of the spring and fall in Kentucky, we find cool-season grasses along with some legumes.  The following descriptions are those forages we see most often:

  • There are many great summertime activities on tap

    We invite all interested Carroll County youth and adults to enter exhibits at the 2013 Carroll County Fair.

    Fair catalogs are available at the Carroll County Exten-sion office, The News-Demo-crat office and other locations around town. Fair entries will be accepted Friday, June 7, from 9 a.m. until noon at the exhibit trailer just inside the fairgrounds. Items must be handcrafted, homemade, or grown by the exhibitor this past year.

    Adults must enter in the open class division and youth may enter in the 4-H or some of the open-class categories.

  • Insecticides can help win battle with carpenter bees

    Have you noticed the presence of carpenter bees around your home lately?

    These beneficial pollinators can be intimidating.  They are relatively large in size and can cause considerable structural damage over time.

    Carp-enter bees spend the winter as adults in their gallery homes.  Now, they are starting new tunnels or expanding old ones in order to raise a brood of about six larvae during the summer.  Accumulations of sawdust may be the first sign that their work has begun.

  • Tasty Travels Across America program offered May 30

    Northern Kentucky Extension agents for family and consumer sciences present a program featuring favorite foods from states all across the country Wednesday, May 30.

    The program is offered twice that day — noon to 1:30 pm and 6-7:30 p.m.

    Due to the success of this program last year, agents are inviting farmers market vendors, food service personnel and FCS educators.

  • 4-Hers get sewing experience, then model their wares
  • Spring weather increase risk of hazardous thunderstorms

    In spring and summer, weather patterns are more active as they move through Kentucky,
    especially in the afternoon and evening, resulting in more thunderstorms.

    These weather conditions also increase the potential for lightning to strike people working or playing outdoors, and even while they are inside a building.

    All thunderstorms produce lightning.  Sometimes called “nature’s fireworks,” lightning is produced by the buildup and discharge of electrical energy between negatively and positively charged areas. 

  • Program, tour focus on home accessibility, universal design

    Would you like to learn ways to make spaces in your home easier for you, your family and friends to use? Do you wish it were easy to do? A special program on universal design, “Home Access-ibility ... Intro-duction to Universal Design and Home Tour” will be held Wednesday, May 22 at the Durr Annex of the Kenton County Cooperative Extension Service in Edgewood.

  • Whole grains: See if they pass the 3-step test

    Less than 5 percent of Americans consume the minimum recommended amount of whole grains.

    Although Ameri-cans generally eat enough total grains, most grains consumed are “refin-ed” grains rather than “whole” grains. Unfortunately, many refined grain foods are high in solid fats and added sugars.

    There is evidence that eating whole grains may reduce the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer (e.g., colon) as well as help control body weight.

  • Gun safety from Eddie the Eagle
  • Emerald Ash Borer has reached county

    The presence of the Emerald Ash Borer, a serious invasive pest of ash trees, has been confirmed in Carroll County.

    The Emerald Ash Borer can attack all species of ash in landscapes, forests and woodlots. The insect will attack stressed and healthy trees greater than about 1.5 inches in diameter.