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Extension

  • Steps for managing insects help prevent crop damage

    Insect infestations in stored wheat can cost a lot of money in treatment expenses or elevator discounts.  The best way to avoid insect problems in stored wheat is to follow preventive management practices from harvest until delivery of the crop for sale.

    These steps include conscientious equipment management before, during, and after harvest as well as good sanitation practices.  Other safeguards are thoroughly drying the crop, timely aeration, and frequently checking grain condition.

  • Club to work on quilt June 9

    The Covergirls Quilt Club will meet from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Monday, June 9 at the Carroll County Extension Office, 500 Floyd Drive, Carrollton. They will start working on the beautiful “Blue Pinwheels Quilt that they are making to be raffled off at the Goldenrod Gala in late August.

  • Federal disaster assistance available to farmers

    The Carrollton Service Center Farm Service Agency is currently conducting sign-ups for livestock disaster assistance programs. 

    These disaster programs are authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill as permanent programs and provide retroactive authority to cover losses that occurred on or after Oct. 1, 2011.

    The three programs are:

    Livestock Forage Program

    The Livestock Forage Program provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who have suffered grazing losses due to drought or fire.

  • Get exhibits ready now for the Carroll County Fair

    The Carroll County Fair is June 6 – 14 and the Carroll County Cooperative Extension Service is getting ready for this year’s event.

    We encourage all Carroll County youth and adults to exhibit items you have made, grown, raised and created so we can showcase our Carroll County talent in the 4-H and Open Class exhibits.

  • Extension celebrates 100 years
  • Make a patriotic basket for the summer holidays

    Would you like a special basket to use for Memorial Day or for the Fourth of July? Basket maker Kathy Watts is teaching a class in weaving the red, white and blue “Patriotic Drum Basket” from 6–9 p.m., Thurs-day, May 21, at the Exten-sion office. To see a picture of the basket, stop by the Extension office for a flier publicizing the class.

    If you are interested in taking this class, please call the Carroll County Extension office at (502) 732-7030 by Friday, May 16, so enough materials can be ready for you. 

  • Safety must be top priority with chemicals

    May is Kentucky Water Awareness Month, and as agricultural producers, high- quality water is very important to us.

    Agricultural chemicals are also an important part of many farm operations.  Used properly, they help produce an abundant, safe food supply.  If mishandled, however, they can contaminate groundwater, which is a source of drinking water for most residents.

    Reduce the chance that improperly used agricultural chemicals might contaminate groundwater by following these steps:

  • Cooperative Extension celebrates 100-year anniversary

    Happy 100th Birthday, Extension!

    Today is a very important milestone. On this day, 100 years ago, the Smith-Lever Act was signed, establishing the Cooperative Extension Service.

    Before the Smith-Lever Act, there were three important acts that paved the way for the purpose of the Extension Service.

  • Celebrates Extension’s 100-year anniversary at open house today

    The Smith-Lever Act creating Cooperative Extension nationwide was signed on May 8, 1914. Today, 100 years later, we will celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Cooperative Extension Service.  Throughout Kentucky, extension offices will be celebrating 100 years of helping people change their lives for the better. 

  • Honey bees play role in pollination, plus make honey

    Insects pollinate a large percentage of food crops grown in the United States and all over the world.  Many different species of pollinators exist, but the insect best equipped for this job is the honey bee.

    Honey bees are exceptionally efficient at collecting and transferring pollen among the flowers of a particular crop.  In a practice known as “flower fidelity” groups of foraging bees will visit just one type of flower, collecting and storing pollen in baskets located on their legs.