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Extension

  • Producing high quality forages vital to animal performance

    The ultimate test of forage quality is animal performance. Producing high quality forages is vital to improved animal performance, whether your goal is more pounds of milk, a higher rate of gain, increased wool production or an improved conception rate.

    Forages provide a major percentage of the nutrients for beef cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and ruminant wildlife. If the quality is not right, you cannot feed animals enough forage to achieve production goals.

  • Child abuse prevention is recognized during April

    April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. Let’s use this time to reflect on this problem and to recognize the importance of good parenting.

  • Current conditions prove favorable for slug infestation

    Slugs are among the first creatures to become active in spring. They scrape their mouthparts across leaves, stems, and flowers to ingest plant tissue.

    Shade gardens are ideal habitats for slugs, along with mulched areas containing bedding plants. New transplants and small seedlings are especially vulnerable to these creatures.

    Soft-bodied slugs require cool, humid conditions, so they usually feed at night and hide during the day. They can be difficult to manage if the conditions that favor them remain unchanged.

  • Search for clovers continues

    4-H Teen Council President Andrea Searcy wrote a grant that supports downtown businesses as well as Carroll County 4-H. Three clovers are distributed in a business and prizes given for the people who find them. Thanks Dinah Marshall for volunteering to be the first business where the clovers were hidden in Artful Gifts. The winners were: Andrew Frye, Angela Rodgers, and Stacy Tuttle.

    Starting April 10, three clovers will be hidden in another business. Here are the clues:

  • Get moving, Carroll County

    Spring is in the air and it is time to get out of the house and Get Moving! Active living not only helps your family stay healthy, but is a great way to enjoy family time. Kentucky adults are not moving enough which is putting them at risk for obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Unfortunately, physically inactive children are also at risk.

  • 4-H Clover Quest is underway

    Carroll County 4-H Clover Quest started on Tuesday, March 28. The hints below will guide you to the first business that is displaying the clovers.

    Three clovers have been placed in a business in Carroll County. The question is, which one? I’m going to give you clues for you to find them and win a prize. You get three chances.

    Clue No. 1

  • Proper mowing now strengthens lawn for summer

    The spring-like temperatures and rain are making a big impact on our yards, and that first mowing of the year is due, if you have not pulled out the lawnmower already. Mowing grass is an important task and there are some points we should consider as we begin the mowing season.

  • Jansen gives information on tax benefits for higher education 

    Higher education costs paid in 2016 can mean tax savings when taxpayers file their tax returns. If taxpayers, their spouses or their dependents took post-high school coursework last year, they may be eligible for a tax credit or deduction.

    Here are some facts from the IRS about tax benefits for higher education coming from Issue Number: IRS Tax Tip 2017-31.

  • 4-H focuses on leadership; new promotion with local businesses

    This year the focus of the 4-H program has been leadership. We now have an active 4-H Teen Council that has attended and will continue to attend leadership workshops and come back to our county and implement new programs.

    In November, our four teen council officers (Kinley Huesman, Andrea Searcy, Clara Tuttle and Madeline Watts) and myself attended a forum called Issues Conference. At this conference they discussed issues that face our teens today, brainstormed and researched ideas so teens could make better decisions.

  • Mild winter has pushed ahead the need to scout for alfalfa weevils

    Alfalfa weevil is the major insect pest of the first alfalfa cutting. Kentucky’s mild winter has pushed development significantly ahead so feeding by weevil larvae is appearing early.

    The tiny pinholes chewed into tip leaves by first and second stage larvae are easy to overlook. The real damage comes a few days later as the third and fourth stages feed voraciously. Individual larvae feed for about three weeks, but eggs hatch over an extended period, so damage can continue for five to six weeks.