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Extension

  • 4-H livestock clinic offers lessons on raising poultry, rabbits

    The first scheduled 4-H program was the livestock clinic that was held Oct. 13, which focused on sheep, goats and beef.  The next one scheduled is a “Poultry and Rabbit Clinic” in the livestock barn on Nov.10 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Carroll County Fairgrounds 4-H Barn.

    During the Poultry meeting, the 4-H youth will be able to identify the parts of their chicken, select an appropriate breed for them, handle a chicken properly and learn to care for their chicken. They will learn how to show their chicken at the county fair.

  • Myths remain about how cool weather affects crops

    There are many myths and old wives tales concerning fruit and vegetable crops that have become part of Kentuc-ky lore.  

    Several myths that still exist today involve grape coloration and fall frosts.

    A number of grape growers believe it is necessary to pick the leaves off the vine to expose the grape clusters to the sun so the grapes will color. 

    This myth probably originated from growers removing leaves to improve air-circulation and reduce fruit rot.

  • November packed with Extension programs

    Having conversations with family members or significant others on handling “end of life” decisions is important.

    Serious illness, injury or death can occur at any age.

    At 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the Exten-sion office, Patty Poor, Grant County family and consumer sciences agent, will share ways to use family “conversations” to plan ahead meeting the wishes of family members. This is a very interactive, informative session.

    It is the November “Learn with Us” lesson. Interested residents invited.

  • Legend creates story of jack-o’-lantern

    Tonight is an especially spook-tacular evening full of ghosts, goblins, princesses, and other creative creatures walking the streets in Carroll County.

    In the spirit of Halloween, this week’s article focuses on a spooky origin of a well-known season staple.

    Jack-o’-lanterns are a popular item to see keeping watch on doorsteps. We see them everywhere and even have pumpkin-carving parties. But do you know the legend behind the jack o’ lantern?

  • FSA county committee voting set to begin Nov. 5

    The Kentucky Farm Service Agency says ballots for the 2012 FSA county committee elections will be mailed to eligible voters on Nov. 5. State FSA Executive Director John McCauley says FSA county committee allows producers to make important decisions concerning the local administration of federal farm programs.

     “I urge all eligible farmers and producers, especially minorities and women, to get involved in their communities by voting in this year’s elections,” McCauley says. 

  • Extension Homemakers host drug-abuse talk

    Carroll County Extension Homemakers invite all interested residents to a special program, “Championing for a Drug Free Carroll County” Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. at the Carroll County Extension Service office, 500 Floyd Drive in Carroll-ton.

    Guest speakers will be Kentucky State Police Trooper Dave Roberts and Champions Coordinator Misty Wheeler.

  • Calculations aid farmers in planning annual hay yields

    October is an important time for livestock producers to assess their winter hay supplies. 

    With the majority of this year’s hay made, now is the time to determine whether you have enough to get your animals through the winter.  Deter-mining this amount is a rather straightforward task.

    Here is how to get a fairly accurate estimate:

  • Program set to create new champion food volunteers

    Do you like to cook? Share food knowledge with others, read food articles and recipes? If so, you might enjoy becoming a Champion Food Volunteer.

    The six-week Champ-ion Food Volunteer Program provides adults a foundation of knowledge, skills, and competencies in basic nutrition; food safety, handling and preparation; cooking; cooking methods and techniques; food science; and physical activity. Classes will be taught Fridays, Feb. 22-March 22, 2013 from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the Gallatin County Extension office.

  • Fall is the time to think spring flowers

    After last week’s article on mulching and composting yard waste during the fall season, I suspect that your lawns and flower beds are clean as a whistle and ready for planting, right?

    Mulching and composting that yard waste will be an ongoing process during the fall, especially after the high winds we experienced this past weekend.

    The downed leaves will certainly give you plenty of mulching and composting practice.

  • Take steps to keep Halloween food items safe for children

    Keep your Halloween safe from foodborne illness with these recommendations from the Partnership for Food Safety Education: