• Steps to safely and effectively remove mold from a building

    Torrential rains and the resulting flood damage that occurred this month left a path of destruction for some homeowners across Kentucky. Sunny skies and warm temperatures help to expedite clean-up efforts, but with high-moisture content in the air, conditions are ripe for the growth of mold and fungi in waterlogged buildings. It takes special care to safely and effectively remove mold from a flood-damaged building.

  • How to select sunglasses

    Wearing sunglasses in the middle of summer may seem like a no-brainer, but not all sunglasses provide protection from ultraviolet rays, and not all adults wear them like they should. According to The Vision Council, 65 percent of American adults view a pair of sunglasses as a fashion accessory rather than a health necessity. One in four adults rarely or never wear sunglasses when going outside, with millennials, adults born between 1981 and 1996, being the least likely to wear sunglasses always or often.

  • Smart snacks for families
  • Flood water contaminated fruits/vegetables unsafe for consumption

     The flash flooding we have experienced recently can take a toll on a vegetable garden, and gardeners should consider how floodwaters could affect the garden.

    The first consideration for the gardener would be the source of the floodwaters. Rain water or water from a potable water source or uncontaminated source does not carry the same potential hazards as water from a river, septic field or other potentially contaminated source.

  • Carroll 4H’ers head to state

    Summer is here, and before you know it, the Kentucky State Fair and Cloverville will be in full swing. This year, the state fair is from Aug. 20-30.

  • Caring for beef cattle a year-round responsibility

    Beef cattle production is a year-round job. There are certain things you can do to make things more organized, whether you have a spring-calving or a fall-calving herd.

    For the spring-calving herd, consider cutting warm season grass pastures for hay if your reserves have not yet been restored. Fescue pastures tend to go dormant in July and August, so look for alternatives like warm-season grasses during this time period. Try to keep young calves gaining weight. Use pastures that you cut for hay; they wil have higher quality regrowth when it is available.

  • Help your children eat healthier

    If we lived in a perfect world, we and all of our children would consume the daily recommended serving of five fruits and vegetables every day, but we don’t. As with many adults, getting children to eat healthier is easier said than done. Here are some tips and tricks to help you get your family eating more nutritious foods.

    • Offer vegetables every day. Children will not eat vegetables if you do not have them prepared and available to them.

  • Heavy rains could negatively impact the tobacco crop

    With the heavy rains over the last few days, University of Kentucky tobacco specialist Dr. Bob Pearce warns that tobacco producers may see some wilting and scald problems as the sun comes back out.

    This situation is similar to what was seen in the tobacco around this same time about two years ago.  What are growers to do?

    Be patient, and hope the crop recovers quickly.

  • Reducing sugary drinks in children’s diets

    Sugar sweetened beverages include a variety of commonly consumed liquids, such as sodas, energy and sport drinks,  lemonade and fruit drinks, sweet tea, flavored water, and coffee. Sales from sugary drinks in the United States totaled $14.3 billion in the year 2013, making them the single largest source of calories in our diet and one of the biggest contributors to high rates of obesity.

  • Avian flu outbreak affecting egg supplies

    A multi-state outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza, including Kentucky, has reduced the United States’ egg laying hen population to the smallest size in at least seven years.

    More than 50 million birds have died.  As a result, egg prices are on the rise in many grocery stores and some folks are wondering if the eggs and poultry products that remain are safe to consume.