.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Extension

  • Herbst enlightens readers with information on turkeys

    With Thanksgiving upon us, let’s talk turkey.

    Turkeys are raised only for meat. They are not raised for egg production, as with chickens, ducks and quail. As a result, turkeys do not produce very many eggs.

    There is only one breed of turkey, but with several varieties. The most common type of commercial turkey raised in the United States is the Broad-Breasted White. It has a larger breast than the other varieties of turkeys.

  • It’s time for country hams

    We’re getting to that time of year again for 4-H country ham projects.

    4-Hers who would like to participate in the country ham project must:

    • Be age 9-18 as of Jan. 1, 2017

    • Pay $60 fee to receive two (2) hams

    • Give a 3-5 minute presentation at the Ken-tucky State Fair on the required topic

    • Be available on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Jan. 16, 2017) to cure green hams

    Adults may also participate, but will be limited to one ham at $40 each.

  • Sanitation important for growing healthy plants

    As we come to the end of the growing season, it is time to focus on landscape sanitation.

    Good sanitation practices can help reduce disease-causing pathogens. These organisms can survive for months or years on dead plant material or in soil, causing infections in subsequent years. Elimination of disease-causing organisms reduces the need for fungicides and can improve the effectiveness of disease management practices.

  • Producers have options for poultry mortality disposal

    Following the tobacco buyout, the poultry industry has dramatically grown and is now Kentucky’s number one commodity. Backyard poultry has also surged in popularity.

    A common issue with any type of animal operation is disposal of mortalities. While dead animal pickup services exist for larger animals, this is not the case for poultry.  How do poultry producers dispose of mortalities?

    Producers need to dispose of poultry mortalities within 48 hours of the animal’s death, so consider having a plan in place before bringing poultry onto your farm.

  • Outstanding Youth | Sachleben
  • Extension hosts Forestry Fall Webinar Series

    Carroll County woodland owners and other interested individuals are invited to attend the Forestry Fall Webinar Series at the Carroll County Extension Office.

    Five webinars are in the series. All webinars begin at 7 p.m. and last approximately an hour. All webinars, except Dec. 6, qualify for one hour of Master Logger continuing education credits.

    The webinars are as follows:

    • Nov. 1, 2016

    Kentucky Forest Health Update.

  • Show sensitivity to food allergies this Halloween

    Halloween is one of the anticipated holidays of the year for many people, but if a child suffers from food allergies, it can be downright frightful for them and their parents. You can support children with food allergies and other medical conditions by participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project.

  • Producers must evaluate several factors before culling cows

    Every year, cow-calf producers need to critically evaluate each animal in the herd for production. There are several factors that play into deciding which cows to cull.

    Open cows (those that are not pregnant) at the end of breeding season are the top of the cull list. Other variables in developing a culling order include structural soundness, body condition score, age, performance, and disposition. Developing a culling order is important during times of drought, a year with marginal hay production, or when managing through a difficult season.

  • Proper cleaning of horse stalls essential to prevent disease

    The Equine Disease Quarterly is a publication produced by UK’s Gluck Equine Research Center in Lexington. This quarterly newsletter has interesting equine information on the state, national, and international levels.

    In the October issue, Dr. Roberta Dwyer in the UK Department of Animal and Food Sciences, offers information on the importance of cleaning and disinfecting stalls.

    Cleaning and disinfecting stalls is critically important for biosecurity, especially in controlling disease outbreaks. However, much misinformation exists.

  • National 4-H Week | Oct. 6, 2016