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Extension

  • Carroll County Conservation District announces 2012 cost share program

    The Carroll County Conservation District will accept requests for cost share funding under the Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share and Environmental Stewardship Program May 14 through June 15.          

    The Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share Program along with the Environ-mental Stewardship Program are created to help agricultural operations protect the soil and water resources of Kentucky. 

  • Healthy diets need fruits, vegetables

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables every day, but a recent Consumer Reports survey shows that only about 30 percent of Ameri-cans are getting their “five-a-day”. 

    Accord-ing to data from a 2009 report from the Kentucky Found-ation for Health, only 17.2 percent of Carroll County adults ate five or more fruits and vegetables a day.

  • Houseplants can be moved outdoors as weather warms

    Moving houseplants outside in late spring or early summer is good for them because they get better air circulation and light exposure. This also is a good time to repot your container-bound plants.

    Wait to move plants outdoors until at least mid- to late-May, or when the weather is consistently warm.  Since most houseplants have a tropical origin, temperatures below 40 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit might damage them.

  • Extension homemakers group to visit museum, Danville

    Carroll County Extension Homemakers will travel to Danville to the Great American Dollhouse Museum Wednesday, May 9. While there, they will also do some touring of the Danville area. The group departs the Carroll county Cooper-ative Extension office at 9 a.m., and returns around 5 p.m. There are still spaces available on the trip. 

  • Spring season brings termite activity in local homes

    Springtime, with its warmer temperatures and more abundant rainfall, is typically the time when winged termites emerge inside homes and other structures. Termites swarm from the colony to disburse, fall to the ground, find mates and start new colonies in the soil.

    From now through May, swarms of winged termites may be seen inside your home, signaling an infestation that can cause extensive and costly damage. Because “swarmers” are attracted to light, they are often seen around windows, doors and light fixtures.

  • My Plate for Older Adults offers healthy, balanced diet

    In June 2011, the U.S. government introduced MyPlate, a new tool to help Americans make healthy food choices.  MyPlate recommends making half your plate fruits and vegetables, eating more whole grains and choosing low-fat dairy products and lean proteins. 

    All Americans can improve their diet by eating the MyPlate way but older adults can especially find MyPlate a valuable resource.

  • Hog initiative in county garners $1,500 grant

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, chaired by Gov. Steve Beshear, approved the Carroll County Agriculture Development Fund Inc. for $1,500 in Carroll County Agricultural Development Funds for the Carroll County Show Hog Initiative.

  • RiverView Farmers Market meeting open to new vendors

    The first seasonal meeting of the RiverView Farmers Market will be held at 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 24 at the Carroll County Extension Office.

    New vendors, or those interested in becoming a new vendor, are welcome to attend the meeting to learn more information about being a member of the Farmers Market. 

    New members will have to undergo Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Training. This information will be discussed at the meeting.

  • Scam artists prey on those who have damage from storms

    Kentuckians have lost a lot as a result of the March 2 tornadoes.

    If you had damage be on the lookout for those who may want to prey on your misfortune. Often, after an area has been hit by a natural disaster, there will be an influx of scam artists and fly-by-night contractors.

  • Pythium root rot found in local tobacco float beds

    The unseasonably warm temperatures prevalent over recent weeks have pushed things in the plant world, including disease. 

    Last week, we confirmed Pythium root rot on some fairly young tobacco seedlings. 

    Pyth-ium root rot is common in tobacco float beds, but we usually do not see much of this disease until ad-April; however, warm weather has created favorable conditions ahead of schedule.