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Extension

  • Resolutions provide a chance to become healthier in 2012

    New Year’s is a great time to make a fresh start at living a healthy life. However, anyone can start over on any day of the year. Here are some tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics that we can use to help middle and high school age kids put into practice. As adults, we can be good models by also trying them out ourselves:

    •                  Eat more fruits and vegetables

  • Ag development board oversees tobacco settlement funding

    In 2000, the General Assembly created the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board. This board was given the task of distributing fifty percent of the state’s monies received from the Master Tobacco Settle-ment Agree-ment.

    The purpose? To assist agricultural development in the Commonwealth.

  • Spice up the holidays by adding herbs to many favorite foods

    When you think of herbs to add to a holiday meal, you may only think of sage for sage stuffing.

    Many of the smells and tastes associated with holiday memories come from familiar herbs and spices. Cooking and garnishing with herbs and spices during the holidays add aromas and a special touch to entertaining in your home and gifts from your kitchen. Here are some seasonings for the season:

    • Bay leaves: Adds a woodsy flavor to soups, sauces and roasts; use them for garnishing serving dishes and to make small wreaths for gifts

  • Block of quilt
  • Beef network helps farmers enhance livestock values

    The Kentucky Beef Network (KBN) and the University of Kentucky have developed a new program, funded by the state Agricultural Development Board, to enhance the value of feeder calves in Kent-ucky. 

    This project lasts for three breeding seasons — Nov-ember 2011 to January 2012, March-June 2012, and November 2012 to January 2013 — and it is a great opportunity for beef cattle producers in Carroll County.

  • Christmas stocking origins may go back to third century

    Nothing signifies the holidays like the hanging of festive colored stockings on the fireplace mantle.

    As with many traditions, the exact origin is unknown.

    However the most recognized origin is the one that honors St. Nicholas. Stockings are mentioned in the 1823 poem, “A Visit from St. Nich-olas,” written by Clement C. Moore.  

    Histor-ically St. Nicholas was a charitable bishop from the third century in Myra which is the modern day Turkey.

  • Extension service thanks legislators with breakfast

    The Carroll County Cooperative Extension Service hosted its first Legislative Appreciation Breakfast Tuesday, Dec. 6.

    The event, held at the Extension office, was attended by a range of government officials including Joe Williams, central/northern Kentucky field representative for the governor; Sen.Ernie Harris, Carroll County Magi-strates Floyd Bowling and Mark Bates and Carrollton Mayor Gene McMurry.  In addition, members of the Carroll County Extension Council attended.

  • Use caution when making eggnog; heat raw eggs first

    The Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has been receiving many questions about the articles and recipes for using raw eggs in making eggnog that has been printed in the media.

    I am sharing the following item to inform my readers of the dangers of consuming raw eggs and to help you adjust your favorite eggnog recipes to be safe.   

    Happy, healthy holidays

  • Taste-testing can add inches and pounds

    During the holidays extra tiny tastes of food may not make a difference in the short run, but little bits from now through New Year’s can result in unwelcome weight gains. During the holiday season I find it hard to resist sampling the food I am preparing or baking. Plus, there are more special social occasions with great food. 

    Here are a few strategies to help curb your tendency to take many tiny tastes:

    • Chew gum when cooking or baking.

  • State’s Agriculture Water Quality Act requires planning

    The Agriculture Water Quality Act was passed by the Kentucky legislature in 1994. It states that landowners with 10 or more acres in agricultural production must develop a water quality plan.

    If you farm 10 or more acres or plan to harvest trees on 10 or more acres in Kentucky, then you are required by state law to implement an agriculture water quality plan. 

    This plan documents the best management practices you’re using to protect water resources.