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Extension

  • Beef quality assurance certification class set for April 21

    Producers who will need to be Beef Quality Assured in order to sell beef at certain sales and to meet the requirements for some of the Phase 1 cost-share programs will need to attend the training on Thurs-day, April 21, at 7 p.m. at the Carroll County Extension Office.

  • Asparagus is a healthy vegetable available each April

    In the next few months you will be seeing asparagus arriving on the local market. This wonderful vegetable packs in a ton of good vitamins and minerals in those stalks. Steam it, pickle it, sauté it, roast it — the possibilities are endless.

  • Make plans now for county fair exhibits

    This year’s Carroll County Fair is June 2-11. I know this is more than a month away, but it is not too early to start thinking of what you might like to enter in the fair.

    What flowers or vegetables might you grow? What items have you made or are making that you could enter? Do you paint or take photographs? Start thinking ahead for what you might want to exhibit. We like to see lots of entries in the open and 4-H classes at the fair. You can win money and ribbons for items that showcase your abilities.

  • Carroll, Owen students travel to Greece during spring break

    I had a wonderful opportunity last week to travel to Greece with students, teachers and parents from Carroll and Owen counties. It was a fun-filled week with a great group. The students from both schools represented us well. We were around school groups from the United States, France, Spain, Italy and Greece, and I will put our kids up against anyone. This is saying quite a bit, as several in the group experienced their first plane ride.

  • New guidelines recommend foods for a healthy diet

    The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans provides recommendations of foods to increase and decrease in our daily diets.

    These guidelines come out every five years and serve as recommendations for what the average Ameri-can should be eating. If we can follow them for healthier eating, we are on our way to better health.

    Foods to increase in your diet:

  • Poisonous hemlock should be controlled early in season

    Controlling poison hemlock in pastures in early spring could help keep pastures and livestock healthy, said J.D. Green, extension weeds specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agricul-ture.

    “Poison hemlock is potentially poisonous to livestock, particularly when animals may graze when other forages are limited, or if large quantities of hay containing poison hemlock are consumed by animals,” Green said. “In addition, poison hemlock can crowd out desirable plants in areas where it becomes established.”

  • Extension office to offer classes on sewing, breadmaking

    Have you always wanted to learn to sew? Carroll County Cooperative Extension will be offering a five-week beginning Sewing Series Tuesday evenings April 26, May 3, 10, 17 and 26 from 6-8 p.m. at our office, 500 Floyd Drive, Carroll-ton. You will learn to use a sewing machine, hand sewing techniques, follow a pattern guide sheet including laying the pattern on the fabric, correct cutting and sewing techniques as you make a pair of pajama pants. Cost of the class is $8 (checks payable to Carroll County Extension Service).

  • New option available for black shank control in tobacco

  • "It's Sew Fine" Sewing Expo returns for fifth year at park

    More than 100 sewing enthusiasts will convene at General Butler State Resort Park in Carrollton Tuesday, April 12 and Wednesday, April 13 to take part in the fifth annual “It’s Sew Fine: for Home and Family” Sewing Expo.

    Grace Angotti, Carroll County Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences and co-chairman of the expo, said sewing is making a big comeback as women return to quilting, sewing for the home, and even sewing for themselves and their families. 

  • A good diet is key to healthy living

    The newly released food guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture address our current American health situation and make some important recommendations.

    An increasing percentage of our population suffers from overweight, poor diet, obesity, forms of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other serious illnesses. The USDA’s revised guidelines should raise awareness of the inherent risks prevalent in American lifestyle choices, characterized by an over-consumption of non-nutrient-dense highly processed foods and a sedentary lifestyle.