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Extension

  • Poisonous hemlock should be controlled early in season

    Controlling poison hemlock in pastures in early spring could help keep pastures and livestock healthy, said J.D. Green, extension weeds specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agricul-ture.

    “Poison hemlock is potentially poisonous to livestock, particularly when animals may graze when other forages are limited, or if large quantities of hay containing poison hemlock are consumed by animals,” Green said. “In addition, poison hemlock can crowd out desirable plants in areas where it becomes established.”

  • Extension office to offer classes on sewing, breadmaking

    Have you always wanted to learn to sew? Carroll County Cooperative Extension will be offering a five-week beginning Sewing Series Tuesday evenings April 26, May 3, 10, 17 and 26 from 6-8 p.m. at our office, 500 Floyd Drive, Carroll-ton. You will learn to use a sewing machine, hand sewing techniques, follow a pattern guide sheet including laying the pattern on the fabric, correct cutting and sewing techniques as you make a pair of pajama pants. Cost of the class is $8 (checks payable to Carroll County Extension Service).

  • New option available for black shank control in tobacco

  • "It's Sew Fine" Sewing Expo returns for fifth year at park

    More than 100 sewing enthusiasts will convene at General Butler State Resort Park in Carrollton Tuesday, April 12 and Wednesday, April 13 to take part in the fifth annual “It’s Sew Fine: for Home and Family” Sewing Expo.

    Grace Angotti, Carroll County Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences and co-chairman of the expo, said sewing is making a big comeback as women return to quilting, sewing for the home, and even sewing for themselves and their families. 

  • A good diet is key to healthy living

    The newly released food guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture address our current American health situation and make some important recommendations.

    An increasing percentage of our population suffers from overweight, poor diet, obesity, forms of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other serious illnesses. The USDA’s revised guidelines should raise awareness of the inherent risks prevalent in American lifestyle choices, characterized by an over-consumption of non-nutrient-dense highly processed foods and a sedentary lifestyle.

  • Signups underway for Phase I, 4-H Camp, woodland workshop

    Applications are currently available at the Carroll County Extension Office for Phase I funds.

    You have until 4:30 p.m. on Wed-nesday, March 30 to complete the application. The sign-up this time has a 25 percent to 75 percent match up to $2,500.

    We will be able to take receipts that are dated from Sept. 21, 2010 through the end of the program. 

    The applications will be scored the evening of March 30 and letters will go out by April 1 notifying you if you have been  approved for the cost-share program.

  • Cost-share, conservation, goat and woodland programs offered through Extension

    Applications are available today, Wednesday, March 16, to sign up for Phase I funding. The deadline is 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 30, to turn in a completed application.
    Applications will be available at the Extension Office and those on my mailing list should expect to receive one in the mail.
    The sign-up this time has a 25 percent to 75 percent match, up to $2,500. We will be able take receipts dated from Sept. 21, 2010, through the end of the program.

  • Updates: Eggs more nutritious; new steps to save energy

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently reviewed standard large eggs from across the country and found that, in the past decade, the average nutrient content of eggs has changed.
    Cho-lesterol levels have de-creased while vitamin D levels have increased. What caused this change? The USDA estimates that the diet of hens has changed over the years, altering nutrients within the egg as a result.

  • Free hunters education class meets March 18-19

    A 10-hour Kentucky hunters education class will meet from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, March 18, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 19, at the Carroll County Extension Building, 500 Floyd Ave., Carrollton.
    The class is required for all hunters born after Jan. 1, 1975. Topics include survival, first aid, firearm safety, ethics, wildlife identification.
    The class is free to anyone 9 years old or older on the day of the class. Another class is set for Aug. 26-27.
    For information, call (502) 732-5120.

  • Phase I, conservation reserve program sign-ups in March

    I hope you noticed the ad in the paper recently about the sign-up period for the Phase I cost-share money.
    Applications will be taken from Wednesday, March 16, through 4:30 p.m. March 30; they will be available at the Extension Office, and anyone on my mailing list will receive an application in the mail. They will be sent out Tuesday, March 15.
    The sign-up this time has a 25- to 75-percent match, with a limit of $2,500. Receipts dated from Sept. 21 through the end of the program will be eligible.