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Extension

  • Program helps in war on drugs

    Because of the overwhelming drug problem that is affecting our county, state and nation today, both youth and adults need an opportunity to learn more about the physical, emotional, financial and legal consequences of getting involved with prescription and illicit drugs. 

    To assist in this endeavor, Truth and Consequences: The Choice is Yours is a Cooperative Extension enrichment activity designed to show students the impact of getting involved with illicit and legal substances. 

  • Helping teens deal with diabetes

    Dealing with Type 2 diabetes can be difficult at any age, but it can be especially troubling for teenagers, who must also deal with the pressures of youth including self-image and self-worth. As a parent, you can do simple things to make managing this disease easier for your teen and your entire family.

  • What is the Zika virus and how it can be controlled

    The Zika virus has created a lot of national and international talk lately. A case of the Zika virus has not be found in Kentucky, and health officials say we face little risk. However, let us learn a little more about the virus and ways we can help control mosquitoes.

  • Fat plays multiple roles in beef cattle production

    Is fat a bad word?  Not necessarily.  Simply put, fat is just the body’s storage form for energy.

    If an animal consumes more energy than it uses, their body will store the excess calories as fat—like money in the bank they can use in an energy shortage (think cows calving in late winter).  Fat imparts flavor to food (like a T-bone steak) but it also adds calories.  Managing fat can be a delicate issue in the cattle business.

  • New dietary guidelines emphasize a lifetime of healthy eating

    The new dietary guidelines were released in January and encourage all of us to make healthy eating choices throughout our lives to minimize our risks of becoming overweight or obese or developing a chronic disease like heart disease or diabetes. These conditions are often linked to poor diets and physical inactivity.

  • 4-H Horse Club meets Feb. 23

    Carroll County is so fortunate to have two sets of horse clubs.

    One horse club, under the leadership of Marla Bickers and Danielle Hickey, has been very productive and has really put Carroll County on the map in the world of horse competition. Their members (Kassandra Hickey, Mallary Bickers, Cassidy Buchanan and Shelby Ackerman) are very competitive and always bring home many champion ribbons. 

  • Get ready to go to 4-H camp July 4-8

    Spring is around the corner and before you know it, summer will be here.

    4-H Camp is a great way to fill those lazy summer days. At 4-H Camp, young people learn independence, responsibility, have a lot of fun and make many friends.

  • Inflammation, is there a diet that helps?

    Picture going for a run and falling and cutting your knees, or working in the garden and having a rose thorn become lodged in your finger. When these and other injuries occur the body tries to remove the harmful, irritated tissues or damaged cells and begin the process of healing by producing inflammation. Redness, heat, swelling, pain and loss of function are signs of acute inflammation but some inflammation can occur without these symptoms.

  • Industrial hemp informational meeting, Feb. 4

    Tonight, Feb. 4, at 7 p.m., an informational meeting on the current research that is being done in production of industrial hemp in Kentucky will be held at the Carroll County Extension Office.

  • Water intake key to winter health

    The three most important things we can do to protect livestock in cold weather are providing sufficient water, giving ample high-quality feed, and offering weather protection.  Cold stress reduces livestock productivity, including rate of gain, milk production and reproductive difficulty, and can cause disease problems.