.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Extension

  • Student learn of leadership, state government through 4-H

    One of the 4-H categories is that of leadership.  Wednesday, March 19, nine people from Carroll County Extension attended the “Capitol Exper-ience” event in Frank-fort and on March 20, 21 and 22, seven delegates attended Teen Summit in Jabez.

    Knowing your elected officials, how the government works and the process of creating political change are all important skills necessary for youth to become active members of society.

  • Children learn many of their eating habits at home

    For parents, being a good role model is a constant challenge and a lifelong job. Kids absorb everything their parents say and do, right down to their eating habits.

    Consider these tips for building a healthy foundation for your kids’ eating habits by starting with yourself.

  • USDA encourages farmers to register early for FSA

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan M. Garcia recently recommended that farmers and ranchers who plan to participate in FSA programs register in advance.

    Producers are encouraged to report farm records and business structure changes to a local FSA Service Center before April 15. 
 

    Enrollment for the disaster programs authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill, including the Livestock Indemnity Program and the Livestock Forage Disaster Program will begin by April 15.
 

  • A little effort can help keep Carroll County beautiful

    As our days get warmer and our snow vanishes, we start to see fast food wrappers, soda cans, cigarette butts and plastic bags littering our roadsides, floating in creeks and even hanging from trees.

    According to a research study conducted by Keep America Beautiful, a non-profit organization devoted to community improvement, littering has decreased in the past 40 years but still continues to be a serious issue across the United States.

    The study estimated that $11.5 billion is spent each year on decreasing and clean-up activities related to litter.

  • Some hay may not provide the necessary nutrition

    A recent article released by Dr. Michelle Arnold, DVM, of the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is notifying cattle producers of the danger this winter has posed on beef cattle of a variety of ages.

    Near the end of most winters, Dr. Arnold says the UKVDL frequently receives diagnostic submissions for necropsy (an autopsy performed on an animal) of aged beef cows. These cattle are often broken-mouthed or toothless and are heavily pregnant or in peak milk production. 

  • Calving is an important part of breeding program

    A successful breeding season actually begins with management decisions made at calving.  Cattle-men can impact rebreeding efficiency by focusing on a number of different things, but body condition score (BCS) is what we are going to take a closer look at today.

    Reproductive management begins with evaluation and management of BCS.

    Body condition score is a numerical estimation of the amount of fat on the cow’s body.  Body condition score ranges from 1-9, with 1 being emaciated while 9 is extremely obese.

  • Tips offer healthy options for St. Patrick’s Day celebrations

    This coming Monday, March 17 is St. Patrick’s Day – a time for celebrating St. Patrick, wearing green and lots of good food friendship and frolic.

    When we lived in Chicago, watching them pour orange dye (yes, orange colored crystals) into the Chicago River and the river turning green was a great part of the Big St. Patrick’s Day celebration.

  • Shooting sports program begins

    The Carroll County 4-H program is so blessed to have such great volunteers.

    This week, I want to focus on the shooting sports program.  This program has five disciplines — archery, shotgun, rifle, target rifle and pistol.

    Tim Tritsch is now the shooting sports coordinator and has a Facebook page to keep everyone in Carroll County abreast of the events. 

  • Kroger cutie pie contest | March 6, 2014
  • Quinoa, chia are proven healthy additions to any diet

    Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is a small, grain-like seed native to the Andes Mountains of South America. It was grown by the Incan people thousands of years ago and is often called the “mother grain.” 

    It is not a true cereal grain, but actually the seed of a plant related to beets, Swiss chard and spinach.

    We call it a grain because it can be prepared and used in the same way as traditional grains.