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Extension

  • Shooting sports club sets its new schedule

    The 4-H shooting sports program opened with shotgun this past Sunday and what a great turn out. The weather was beautiful, the adults were supportive, the 4-H members were shooting and the leaders were so excited.

    The following is the schedule for shooting sports:

    • Shotgun will meet every Sunday from 2-5 p.m. on Hwy. 389 at the Michael Walls/Cody Human property. 

    • Rifle will meet from 5:30-6:30 p.m., Thursday, April 10.

    • Pistol will start at 4 p.m., Sunday, April 13 and meet every other Sunday.

  • People with diabetes can benefit from group

    If you have diabetes and often wish you could talk with someone about your diabetes and your health, the “It’s About You!” diabetes support group usually meets the second Thursday of the month from 10 a.m. until noon at the Carroll County Extension Service, 500 Floyd Drive. The meeting includes discussion of participants concerns, time for answering questions and a short program and a healthy food sample. 

  • Spring weather changes can lead to grass tetany in cattle

    In last week’s article, we focused on greening pastures with the warmer temperatures arriving. I also mentioned being aware of grass tetany, so this week, we are going to take a closer look at this condition.

    Grass tetany is a condition caused by an abnormally low level of magnesium in the blood. It is also called spring tetany, grass staggers, wheat pasture poisoning, winter tetany or lactation tetany.

  • Quiltville founder to address sewing expo at Butler Park

    More than 160 sewing enthusiasts will converge at General Butler State Resort Park in Carrollton Monday, April 14, through Wed-nesday, April 16.

    Nine years ago the Louisville and Northern Kentucky area Cooper-ative Exten-sion Agents for Family and Consumer Sciences wanted to give sewing enthusiasts in this region of the county exposure to renown national sewing professionals and a chance to increase their sewing knowledge through an array of expanded sewing classes.  The “It’s Sew Fine” sewing expo was the result.

  • Student learn of leadership, state government through 4-H

    One of the 4-H categories is that of leadership.  Wednesday, March 19, nine people from Carroll County Extension attended the “Capitol Exper-ience” event in Frank-fort and on March 20, 21 and 22, seven delegates attended Teen Summit in Jabez.

    Knowing your elected officials, how the government works and the process of creating political change are all important skills necessary for youth to become active members of society.

  • Children learn many of their eating habits at home

    For parents, being a good role model is a constant challenge and a lifelong job. Kids absorb everything their parents say and do, right down to their eating habits.

    Consider these tips for building a healthy foundation for your kids’ eating habits by starting with yourself.

  • USDA encourages farmers to register early for FSA

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency Administrator Juan M. Garcia recently recommended that farmers and ranchers who plan to participate in FSA programs register in advance.

    Producers are encouraged to report farm records and business structure changes to a local FSA Service Center before April 15. 
 

    Enrollment for the disaster programs authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill, including the Livestock Indemnity Program and the Livestock Forage Disaster Program will begin by April 15.
 

  • A little effort can help keep Carroll County beautiful

    As our days get warmer and our snow vanishes, we start to see fast food wrappers, soda cans, cigarette butts and plastic bags littering our roadsides, floating in creeks and even hanging from trees.

    According to a research study conducted by Keep America Beautiful, a non-profit organization devoted to community improvement, littering has decreased in the past 40 years but still continues to be a serious issue across the United States.

    The study estimated that $11.5 billion is spent each year on decreasing and clean-up activities related to litter.

  • Some hay may not provide the necessary nutrition

    A recent article released by Dr. Michelle Arnold, DVM, of the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is notifying cattle producers of the danger this winter has posed on beef cattle of a variety of ages.

    Near the end of most winters, Dr. Arnold says the UKVDL frequently receives diagnostic submissions for necropsy (an autopsy performed on an animal) of aged beef cows. These cattle are often broken-mouthed or toothless and are heavily pregnant or in peak milk production. 

  • Calving is an important part of breeding program

    A successful breeding season actually begins with management decisions made at calving.  Cattle-men can impact rebreeding efficiency by focusing on a number of different things, but body condition score (BCS) is what we are going to take a closer look at today.

    Reproductive management begins with evaluation and management of BCS.

    Body condition score is a numerical estimation of the amount of fat on the cow’s body.  Body condition score ranges from 1-9, with 1 being emaciated while 9 is extremely obese.