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Extension

  • With new school year, 4-H enrollment set to begin

    School begins today and enrollment for 4-H will soon be taking place. Watch for the information to come home with your child. 

    Chances are if your young person has an interest, 4-H has a program that explores it. Not only does 4-H provide an opportunity for its members to try something they think they might enjoy, but 4-H’s programs are designed in a way that 4-H’ers will learn many valuable life skills in the process.

  • Grazing school offers hands-on learning experiences

    The 2013 Kentucky Grazing School is being held this month, Aug. 21-22, in Woodford County.

    This grazing school is an excellent educational opportunity for producers.

    Last year, I attended the school and was very impres-sed by the hands-on activities we worked through. In addition, I was able to meet and talk with producers from around the state, learning about their grazing operations.

  • Use caution when grilling to prevent foodborne illness

    It’s been a wonderful summer, and there will still be many days when we are outdoors at a picnic, grilling or eating outdoors. But, don’t ruin that time by getting sick from foodborne illness.

    Keeping bacteria at bay
    on your grilling day

    Thunderstorms, insects and annoying relatives are not the only thing that could ruin a cookout. Many beloved summertime foods are susceptible to contamination by several foodborne bacteria.

  • Farmers market provides fresh, locally grown items

    This week is full of neat agriculture-related events in and around the county.  Here’s a preview of what is to come:

    A taste of the RiverView Farmer’s Market

    The RiverView Farmers Market is open two days a week during the growing season. Times are on Wednesdays, 2-5 p.m., at Point Park and Saturdays, 8 a.m.-noon at the Hometown Pizza parking lot.

    This week, I will be out at the Farmer’s Market on both days, providing information about a staple in the summer garden:  tomatoes.

  • Fun times at 4-H camp
  • 4-H camp | July 29, 2013

     

     Carroll County Extension 4-H agent Joyce Doyle took 58 campers, six junior counselors and five adult counselors to North Central 4-H camp in Carlisle, Ky., July 15-19. Carroll County camps with Bracken, Grant, Harrison, Pendleton and Robertson counties. More photos will be in the July 31 issue.

  • Preserving the flavors of summer — safe home canning

    Our gardens, orchards and farmers markets are overflowing with fresh produce!  It’s a great time to preserve some of summer’s bounty by home canning locally grown fruits and vegetables. Home canning can save money, provide a sense of accomplishment and yield wonderful gifts for family and friends. For best results and safe, good-tasting products, be sure to follow USDA recommendations:

     

    Start with the freshest, best quality fruits and vegetables. Spoilage and loss of vitamins begin right after harvest.

  • Livestock, pets must be protected from extreme heat

    Last week, the county definitely got a taste of the summer heat. Accord-ing to our local Kentucky Mesonet system, actual air temperatures reached 90 degrees Fahren-heit or above, for five out of seven days.

    This week’s change in the weather is providing a reprieve from the summer heat, but we should always be prepared to deal with higher temperatures around the farm and home.

  • 4-H well represented at statewide event

    How much excitement can a 4-H agent have? Shooting sports is up and going great. If your child has signed up for shooting sports but has not been contacted, please call the Extension office and get the information. 

    Saturday was a great day at the State Communications Day at the University of Kentucky. Carroll County had four members who attended the competition, and all four received blue ribbons. It is an honor to make it to state, but to receive a blue ribbon at state is a wonderful accomplishment.

  • Rain can increase problem insects

    Several insects thrive and arrive after prolonged rains.  Expect an increase in accidental invaders, including spiders, millipedes, centipedes, sowbugs/pillbugs, gnats, and springtails that enter structures in response to high water or extend their of activity because of humidity and dampness.