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Extension

  • Use certificates for sharing gifts of joy with others

    Developing ideas for creative holiday gifts or making them is an enjoyable, economical way to remember friends and family members during the upcoming season.

    A babysitting gift certificate may be one of the best gifts a young mother receives, especially if she has infants and very young children.  Several hours of babysitting will enable her to enjoy some free time.

    If there’s a handyman or gardener in your household, give elderly friends and relatives certificates for home repairs and yard work they may be unable to do.

  • Meaningful holidays for your children

    Holidays can bring joy and fun especially to children. Children always look forward to receiving presents, often times costly and unnecessary ones.  Sometimes our children are more concerned about the presents they want to get and forget the true meaning of the holidays — shared time and enriching experiences.

    Here are a few tips for parents to help their children look beyond all of the seasonal product-driven marketing:

  • CAIP application deadline Dec. 18

    Applications are now available for the 2015 Carroll County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP) at the Carroll County Conservation District Office, 1804 Highland Avenue, Carrollton or the Carroll County Extension Office.

    All applications must be into the Conservation District Office by Dec. 18 at 4:30 p.m.

    Office hours for the Conservation District are as follows:  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday– 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Wednesday – 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

  • Extension homemaker holiday craft ideas
  • Leftover turkey talk

    The holidays are quickly approaching, and with them, the season of great eating. Soon, you’ll have more turkey and dressing than you’ll know what to do with.

    It’s a great idea to save your Thanksgiving leftovers, as it stretches your holiday food dollars and provides quick meals for your family. Leftovers must be stored and reheated safely to prevent foodborne illnesses. Follow these tips to ensure your leftovers are safe to eat:

  • Manure management, possible nutrient benefit

    As you walk into my office, you may notice my little farm animal figurines on the shelf.  I have just about every species of farm animal covered:  beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, goats, donkeys, alpacas, poultry, rabbit, and the list goes on.  These little guys come in real handy when I am not able to bring in the real thing, especially to a classroom.

    They are the easiest animals to take care of because they barely eat a thing and manure management is a breeze (wink, wink).

  • Dec. 1 is the deadline to enter 4-H ham project

    It is that time of year again to get ready for the 4-H country ham project. By Dec. 1, those interested in the 4-H Country Ham project must let me know so that the number can be sent to the University of Kentucky.

  • Slow Food Movement embodies traditions and sustainability

    Eco-gastronomy. It’s not a word you hear every day. And if you look in a dictionary, chances are you won’t find it. But to the 80,000 members of Slow Food, it is an apt description of their growing worldwide movement.

    According to the Slow Food website, the word describes “the strong connections between plate and planet,” and in an age when people are beginning to take an interest in sustainable living concepts, it’s a word you may see used more frequently.

  • Feed bunk management an important task in calf care

    Managing feed intake in calves is an important task to pay attention to, and Dr. Roy Burris, Beef Extension Professor at the University of Kentucky, offers his expertise on the topic:

    The most common problem Dr. Burris sees in feeding calves is feed bunk management. It sounds simple but it can be a real problem … one that can easily be solved by paying attention to details.

    Start with managing self-feeders.  Just dump the feed in and the calves take care of the rest, right?  Wrong.

  • Tips for managing holiday stress

    The holidays are fast approaching and while you probably haven’t hit your maximum stress level yet, it will surely hit soon enough.  With last minute shopping, problems with turkey baking, finding all your stuffed-away decorations and dealing with relatives right around the corner, it’s expected that everyone will have stressful moments.