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Today's Features

  • Local musicians will perform on first Thursdays in May through July at Welch’s Riverside Restaurant. Owners Junior and Donna Welch want to focus attention on Carroll County’s musicians and also the recent charge of making their restaurant smoke free.

  • Three Rivers District Health Department would like to remind anyone who is planning to prepare food for the public during a county event or otherwise that a permit is required prior to operation.  Permits can be obtained at your local Health Department.  Contact (502) 484-3412 or visit www.trdhd.com/inspections for more information. 

    Permit costs are:

    • 30 days or more prior to event:  $25 to $30 depending on length of event.

    • Less than 30 days to event:  $50 to $55 depending on length of event.

  • Green Valley Crusaders will be hosting a chili supper and silent auction to benefit Relay For Life on Saturday, April 27 at News Auction, located on Hwy. 227.  The event is scheduled from 5-9 p.m.  Cost is $7 per person, which includes chili, sandwich, dessert and drink.  A silent auction will also be held during this event.  For more information please contact Green Valley at (502) 732-6683. All proceeds go to the Carroll County Relay For Life.

  • Wednesday, April 24

    Carrollton Rotary Club meets Wednesday at noon at the lodge at General Butler State Resort Park.

    AA Big Book study groups meets every Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Carrollton Christian Church, 310 Fifth St.

    Cartmell Elementary School Site Based Decision Making Council meets at 3:30 p.m. at the school.

    Family Ties holds its annual Community Baby Shower from 6-7:30 p.m. at Cartmell Elementary School.

    Thursday, April 25

  • McCool to perform at First Apostolic Church

    Gospel singer Greg McCool Sr. of Crossville, Tenn., will sing and give his testimony at the First Apostolic Church, 111 Third Street in Carrollton at 11 a.m., Sunday, April 28. His voice and guitar playing are some of the best in country gospel music.  McCool began his music career more than 36 years ago playing guitar in nightclubs and for some of Nashville’s best singers.  But since giving his life to God, he has been singing and playing gospel music for over 19 years.  Everyone is invited.

  • There once was a carpenter who visited one of two brothers who had recently grown resentful with each other over a misunderstanding over the farm they had managed together for the past 40 years.

  • The Northern Kentucky and Louisville region Family and Consumer Sciences Cooperative Extension program hosted our eighth annual “It’s Sew Fine” Sewing Expo Tuesday and Wed-nesday, April 16 and 17 at General Butler State Resort Park here in Carrollton.

    About 100 sewing enthusiasts from the central region of the United States were in attendance. Instructors from as far away as New York, to Kentucky to nearby Indiana challenged participants to learn new sewing techniques.

  • With pastures greening up well across the county, it is time to start planning ahead of summer pasture needs for your horses.

    Pasture provides a significant percentage of horses’ nutrient needs. Al- though horses have more grass than they can consume in the spring when moisture is adequate, the hot, dry conditions of summer greatly reduce available pasture.  Good management is the key to getting through this growth slump.

  • Cartmell Elementary students traveled to Pendleton County Saturday to compete in the District 4-H Communications event. Congratulations to the following 4H students who will be representing Carroll County in the 4H State Competitions:

    Lauren Perkinson in food - Delicious Pound Cake

    Lorinda Bennett in clothing - Sew Fun

    Luke Heveline in safety - Dirt Bike Riding

    Jayden Jones in general - Hermit Crabs

    Clara Tuttle in home environment - Make Your Own Laundry Detergent

  • Gail Becraft’s secret to longevity in the field of education: Teach what you love.

    A native of Menifee County in Eastern Kentucky, Becraft earned her bachelor’s degree in education at Northern Kentucky University. She later earned her master’s at University of Louisville.

    In 1990, she moved to Carroll County with her husband, Brad, who had landed a job teaching physics and math at Carroll County High School. Fresh out of college, she was hired to teach at Cartmell Elementary School.