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Today's Features

  • This year’s Carroll County Fair is June 2-11. I know this is more than a month away, but it is not too early to start thinking of what you might like to enter in the fair.

    What flowers or vegetables might you grow? What items have you made or are making that you could enter? Do you paint or take photographs? Start thinking ahead for what you might want to exhibit. We like to see lots of entries in the open and 4-H classes at the fair. You can win money and ribbons for items that showcase your abilities.

  • This year’s Carroll County Fair is June 2-11. I know this is more than a month away, but it is not too early to start thinking of what you might like to enter in the fair.

    What flowers or vegetables might you grow? What items have you made or are making that you could enter? Do you paint or take photographs? Start thinking ahead for what you might want to exhibit. We like to see lots of entries in the open and 4-H classes at the fair. You can win money and ribbons for items that showcase your abilities.

  • I had a wonderful opportunity last week to travel to Greece with students, teachers and parents from Carroll and Owen counties. It was a fun-filled week with a great group. The students from both schools represented us well. We were around school groups from the United States, France, Spain, Italy and Greece, and I will put our kids up against anyone. This is saying quite a bit, as several in the group experienced their first plane ride.

  • Workers who sustain injuries on the job will find a new face at Carroll County Memorial Hospital ready to assist them with their recovery.

    Dr. Sherrell Nunnelley assumed his full-time role as medical director of occupational medicine two weeks ago, but he has been working at CCMH a couple of days each week for the past two months.

    “For the past 20 years, I have been taking care of all kinds of injuries,” Nunnelley said.

  • Workers who sustain injuries on the job will find a new face at Carroll County Memorial Hospital ready to assist them with their recovery.

    Dr. Sherrell Nunnelley assumed his full-time role as medical director of occupational medicine two weeks ago, but he has been working at CCMH a couple of days each week for the past two months.

    “For the past 20 years, I have been taking care of all kinds of injuries,” Nunnelley said.

  • Sometimes, you gotta look that gift horse in the mouth.

    While the legal profession has given Carrollton resident Stan Billingsley plenty of “gifts” – including a stint in the Kentucky Legislature and a career as a lawyer and a judge in district and circuit courts – he has taken a critical look at the state’s legal ethics system through a thinly veiled parody of an existing case in his new book, “Alice vs. Wonderland: A Chilling Tale of the Abuse of Power in the Name of Lawyers’ Ethics.”

  • Wednesday, April 13

    Family Community Pharmacy Program will screen potential clients from 9-11 a.m. at the Northern Ky. Community Action Center, Highland Avenue. Call (502) 732-5253.

    Carrollton Rotary Club meets at noon at General Butler State Resort Park.

    SNIP registration is held at Carroll County Public Library for spaying/neutering, 6-7:30 p.m.

    Carroll County Tobacco Festival Committee meets 6:30 p.m. at Welch’s Riverside Restaurant.

  • The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans provides recommendations of foods to increase and decrease in our daily diets.

    These guidelines come out every five years and serve as recommendations for what the average Ameri-can should be eating. If we can follow them for healthier eating, we are on our way to better health.

    Foods to increase in your diet:

  • Controlling poison hemlock in pastures in early spring could help keep pastures and livestock healthy, said J.D. Green, extension weeds specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agricul-ture.

    “Poison hemlock is potentially poisonous to livestock, particularly when animals may graze when other forages are limited, or if large quantities of hay containing poison hemlock are consumed by animals,” Green said. “In addition, poison hemlock can crowd out desirable plants in areas where it becomes established.”

  • I read recently of an incident that happened many years ago during a British conference on the different world religions.