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Today's Features

  • Thursday, July 31
    Narcotics Anonymous meets at 6:30 p.m. every Thursday at Carrollton Christian Church, 310 Fifth St.
    Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., Carrollton Christian Church.
    Friday, Aug. 1
    Caby M. Froman Club meets at noon at Butler Park lodge.
    Carroll County Community Development Corporation meets at noon at Butler Park lodge.
    AA Big Book study groups meets every Friday at 2 p.m. at Carrollton Christian Church, 310 Fifth St.

  • The end of July is upon us, and with the close of the month also comes the winding down of summer.
    Sure, we have a few sweltering days ahead of us, and yes…the last day of summer is not until Sept. 21, but really, it is the coming of the new school year that signals the end of summer.  
    I know it is not necessarily a happy time for students and teachers, but for the rest of us, the beginning of school brings us back into a routine.

  • If you ask many 4-H alumni to name one of the most valuable life skills they learned during their 4-H careers, many would list the confidence gained through participating in communications projects. 4-H youth development strives to equip young people with the knowledge and skills they need to become successful adults. Effective communication and public speaking skills are vital to tomorrow’s leaders.

  • The time is quickly approaching to consider renovation of pastures.
    The decision to reseed pastures can be based on multiple reasons, like renovating old stands that are dying out causing bare spots, reducing the number of undesirable weeds and forages, introducing a new forage species, and controlling forage-related disorders.

  • This past week, 12 people interested in learning food preservation methods attended our very successful food preservation workshop at the Carroll County Extension office. Local extension volunteer and food processor Bobby Giles of Carrollton was a great help in helping me teach the workshop. Thank you so much, Bobby! We gave them hands-on experience in canning green beans, strawberry jam and freezing sweet corn and concentrated on the USDA-approved techniques and information.

  • How can God, who is all-loving and all-powerful, allow evil to exist in a world that he created? This is the question that believers and unbelievers alike have been asking for generations.
    The nature of the problem of evil will never begin to be understood by this city or anyone else, until it is examined from a scriptural point of view, understanding that scripture interprets scripture. (2 Timothy 3:16 KJV)

  • Workshop planned on spiritual renewal
    Second Baptist Church, 611 Sycamore St in Carrollton will hold a Spiritual Renewal Workshop, 6:30 p.m. July 22-24, the speaker for Thursday, July 24 will be the Rev. Dr. Frank Houston.

    Monthly hymn sing set at Sanders church
    Sanders Baptist Church will host its monthly hymn sing 6:30 p.m., Sunday, July 27. The congregation invites the public to attend.
     

  • Thursday, July 24
    Champions for a Drug-Free Carroll County meets at 11:30 a.m. in the community room, Carroll County Public Library.
    Lions Club meets at noon at Butler Park lodge.
    Carroll County Board of Education meets 5 p.m. in the middle school media center.
    Carroll County High School football boosters meet at 6 p.m. at the high school media center.
    Carroll County Republican Party meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Thursday of the month on the second floor of the old court house.

  • The Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission received an $87,000 contribution to help families and  children have enough to eat.  
    The donation – which was given to the non-profit organization through the Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program – will work to keep the shelves stocked at a local food pantry and help families start and expand food gardens in Carroll County.

  • At a meeting toward the end of June, I had a discussion about how quickly the summer was going by and that it seemed like it was almost over. The funny part about this discussion is that summer had not actually even started.
    Our definition of the seasons is no longer determined by when they actually start, but by when our idea of them starts. Summer might be the most extreme example of this, but they all seem to follow the pattern ingrained in us by the schedule we followed from age 5 to age 18: the school calendar.