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Local News

  • Taylor one of 21 DOCJT telecommunication grads

    Twenty-one law enforcement dispatchers, including Darrius Taylor of Carroll County Dispatch, graduated Nov. 18, from the Public Safety Dispatch Academy at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice Training.

    The graduates hail from communications centers across the state, and comprise DOCJT’s 109th telecommunications academy class, which first began in 1999.

  • Carroll County Animal Support to disband citing no progress at shelter

    The heart and soul of the Carroll County Animal Support group Tammie Crawford announced on the group’s Facebook page Nov. 29, that the organization would not be taking any more calls or pleas for help.

    In an interview Dec. 6, Crawford said she finally experienced burnout. “The frustration of not getting any changes at the shelter just finally got to be too much,” she said. “We saved a lot of lives, but could not make any changes.”

  • True, Hendrickson give closing arguments

    Defense: J. Guthrie True

    True called the inconclusive FBI report on Clay Cable’s initials on the KSP 41 “a game-ender,” during his closing statements to the jury Friday. He added that the FBI also could not determine whether the same person wrote everything on that line.

  • Community steps up again sending food, clothing to Smoky Mountain communities

    Carroll County is a community that responds to the call for help as recently witnessed by the support of the flooded areas of West Virginia and the water quality crisis in Flint, Mich.

    The community is stepping up again in wake of the fires in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that have affected locations that hold memories for many local folks. Hurricane force winds started a fire storm that quickly moved from Chimney Top toward the communities of Gatlinburg, Tenn. and Pigeon Forge, Tenn., forcing the evacuation of Gatlinburg.

  • KINMAN FOUND NOT GUILTY

    “Not guilty.”

    After hearing those words, Carroll County Sheriff Jamie Kinman began to cry into the arms of his attorney, J. Guthrie True.

    More than two years after his indictment and more than three years after the investigation began, Kinman was finally “free to go.”

    A jury of eight men and four women found Kinman not guilty Dec. 2, of tampering with physical evidence, specifically a KSP 41 or chain of custody form in Marcell Hankins’ case.

  • Carrollton Utilities Groundbreaking
  • Kinman Trial: Day 3

    Two key witnesses testified on the third day of Sheriff Jamie Kinman's trial in Carroll a County Circuit Court. Kinman is charged with tampering with physical evidence and second-degree official misconduct. 

  • Jury seated, testimony begins in Kinman trial

    Testimony is underway in the case involving Carroll County Sheriff Jamie Kinman, who faces charges of tampering with physical evidence, a class D felony, and second-degree official misconduct, a class B misdemeanor. The trial began Monday, Nov. 28, in Carroll County Circuit Court, with Special Judge Richard Brueggemann presiding.

    It took about seven hours–the entire first day of trial–but a jury of 14 people (nine men and five women) were selected. Two of the jurors are alternates and will be dismissed by random draw before deliberation.

  • River walk extension set to move forward

    The river walk expansion project took another step forward, as Carrollton City Council hired American Engineering of Glasgow, Ky., as the engineer. The company will oversee the river walk extension over the Jefferson Community and Technical College parking lot and on the west end toward Point Park and for the asphalt trail from Point Park to the 2Rivers Campground along the Kentucky River. The company was previously hired as the engineer on the Bow Bridge restoration project.

  • Fiscal court seeks more information on proposed jail body scan policy

    Carroll County Regional Detention Center presented Carroll County Fiscal Court with its proposed body scan policy for inmates being processed into the jail.

    Carroll County Jailer Michael Humphrey said this is the only change he has to the policy manual.

    Fiscal Court tabled approving the policy to the Dec. 13, meeting so they could review the policy in more depth.