.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Powers arrested by sheriff’s office

    The Carroll County Sheriff’s Office made its final arrest as a part of the multi-agency undercover drug investigation.

    Daniel L. Powers, 25, 62 Center St., Radcliff, surrendered Thursday, Feb. 16 to Sheriff Jamie Kinman and Deputy J.T. Shaw at the Carroll County Hall of Justice, according to a news release. He was indicted for two counts of trafficking in a controlled substance second degree, first offense, a Class D felony.

  • Ghent looks to repair church for Lighthouse

    Ghent Mayor William Mumphrey is hoping to get Phase II of the project to renovate the city-owned Christian church under way soon.

    During a town hall meeting Friday night, Feb. 17, in City Hall, which occupies rooms attached to the rear of the aging church, Mumphrey said he had obtained estimates for a laundry list of repairs that are needed just to make the space usable.

  • Citizens get voice in city plan

    City leaders and members of the community dedicated an hour-and-a-half of their time Thursday night to discussing the current state of Carrollton and how it can grow and thrive in the future.

    Bobbie Bryant, community development advisor for the Kentucky League of Cities, facilitated the meeting, which was attended by about 80 people and held at the Carroll County Middle School cafeteria.

  • Opiates create drug problems

    On the day Whitney Houston died from a suspected drug overdose, between two and three Kentuckians also died from known drug overdoses. Kentucky loses about 1,000 people per year from drug overdoses, more than those who die in car accidents.

    While Houston’s death has not been officially attributed to drug and alcohol abuse, it has long been documented she struggled with addictions to both. 

  • CCMH becomes affiliate of Norton Healthcare

    Carroll County Memorial Hospital joined with officials from Norton Healthcare Tuesday morning to announce an affiliation agreement that will make expanded services available to the community and medical providers.

    CCMH Chief Executive Officer Kanute Rarey said the affiliation agreement provides access to expanded resources through Norton Healthcare for patients.

  • Schools look to beef up education on drug abuse

    The drug problem in Carroll County is well documented, the latest example of which was the multi-agency drug roundup on traffickers conducted Feb. 8. But what steps need to be taken to eliminate it?

    One approach is to focus on the future generation of adults in the community: the high school students.

  • Special guests to appear at Rotary Ball

    Carrollton Rotary Club, with help from local businessman Herb Kinman, has lined up two country music stars as special guests for Saturday night’s Rotary Ball.

    Performers T.G. Sheppard and Kelly Lang, who are husband and wife, will serve as auctioneers during the event at General Butler State Resort Park Conference Center, project chairman Nick Marsh said Monday.

    Another Kentuckiana television personality will also take part in the event. WAVE3 television news anchor Janell McDonald will handle emcee duties during the ball, Marsh noted.

  • Students must be ‘proficient’ in reading, math by 2012-14

    Changes in Kentucky’s student testing procedures mean that Carroll County students will be required to be 100 percent “proficient” in reading and math by the end of the 2013-14 school year.

    That’s the message Superintendent Lisa James delivered to members of the Carroll County Board of Education Thursday, Feb. 9.

  • Community listening session Thursday

    The city of Carrollton will hold a community listening session at Carroll County Middle School cafeteria at 7 p.m. Feb. 16  to provide information about what has occurred on several projects in downtown and along the waterfront, as well as to receive residents’ comments, thoughts, ideas and concerns.

  • Drug Roundup Indictments

    INDICTMENTS

    Christine S. Hewitt, 38, was indicted for first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance, first offense, a class D felony, punishable by imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than five years in the penitentiary and a fine of not less than $1,000 nor more than $10,000 in that she knowingly and unlawfully trafficked in a schedule II narcotic drug, namely Opana.