Local News

  • Carroll County Fiscal Court briefs - Aug. 10, 2011

    NKADD hired to oversee county energy grant

    Carroll County Fiscal Court agreed to hire Northern Kentucky Area Development District to administer a state energy efficiency grant. Judge Harold “Shorty” Tomlinson said the cost is $3,750 and they will develop the advertisement needed to bid and handle the paperwork with the grant reporting process.

  • CFD battles two back-to-back fires

    The Carrollton Fire Department fought two structure fires back-to-back Friday, one of which is still under investigation as a possible meth lab.

    The first call was dispatched at 8:49 p.m. to 1167 Brock Drive. The fire department arrived on scene at 8:55 p.m. Assistant Fire Chief Harold “Tinks” Dews said a toaster sparked the electrical fire and caused minimal damage to the kitchen. He said a neighbor called dispatch after seeing the fire through the window. No one was home at the time. Marry Anderson owns the home.

  • Marlette enters plea in assault

    David N. Marlette, 29, of Ghent pleaded guilty to fourth degree assault Thursday in Carroll County District Court, with Judge Elizabeth Chandler presiding. He was sentenced to two years of probation on the Class A misdemeanor, with the condition that if he violates his probation he would serve 365 days in jail. He may have no unlawful contact with the victim and also must pay restitution and medical bills.

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  • Board of Ed OKs tax hike to hold revenue

    Carroll County Board of Education members found themselves between a rock and a hard place Monday night as they gathered to set the 2011-12 tax rate.

    At a special-called meeting, board members learned that a sharp decline in the value of inventory held by businesses in the county could translate into less money coming into their coffers.

  • Manslaughter, fetal homicide charges against King dropped

    Felony charges were dropped Monday in the case involving a 2007 motorcycle crash in Shively that killed a Carrollton woman and her unborn child.

  • Humphrey named to jailer’s board

    Carroll County Jailer Mike Humphrey has been re-elected to the Kentucky Jailer’s Association Board of Directors.

    Humphrey was elected Carroll County Jailer in 1993. He has served on the KJA Board since 2001.

    “Being on the board gives me more insight to what is going on across the state,” Humphrey said. “It allows us to be more active with other counties and with the association. It also helps us receive updated information about what is going on with current legislation.”

  • Health officials say breastfeeding aids children

    In honor of World Breastfeeding Week Aug. 1-7. the Kentucky Department for Public Health stresses the importance of providing support for breastfeeding families.

    According to DPH, mothers have more success breastfeeding their babies when they have adequate support from healthcare providers, family, friends and their community. The 2011 World Breastfeeding Week slogan “Breastfeeding Support: Stay connected” focuses on the importance of the connection between mother and baby as well as the importance of having support.

  • Poker run to help children this Christmas

    The second Helping Kids in our Neighborhood Poker Run is expected to attract about 200 bikers this year to aid Carroll County children in need this Christmas.

    Organizer Kenny Jones said there has been a great response already this year for the Aug. 21 event, which begins and ends at Sunset Grill in Warsaw.

    “People have really been generous this year,” he said, noting the group has received many donations, including tickets to see an Indianapolis Colts game and a Pittsburg Steelers game, as well as many autographed items to help raise funds.

  • Radon: Lack of knowledge could kill

    By Gina Clear

    Landmark News Service

    As the adage goes, “What we don’t know can’t hurt us.” But authorities on radon say lack of knowledge on the subject could be killing us.

    “It’s astonishing, frankly,” said Professional Learning Institute Dean Steve Keeney, “but there’s nobody out there explaining the risk to the public.”