.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • County signs on with 2-1-1 info system

    The Trimble Banner

    Trimble County residents will be able to dial 2-1-1 for local information on just about anything.

    The 2-1-1 Crisis and Information line is funded by Metro Louisville United Way and operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week by staff at Seven Counties, according to the Metro United Way Web site.

    Glen Powell, a Trimble County resident, is director of the program and asked Fiscal Court on Monday to approve a memorandum of agreement to join the service. The cost to the county is about 3 cents per capita, or $300.

  • Federal wage hike means more pay for EMS crew

    The Trimble Banner

    To comply with the federal government’s mandate to raise the minimum hourly wage to $7.25,  Trimble County Fiscal Court voted in raises to employees in the county ambulance service – all of whom are paid by the hour.

    The law became effective July 1, and Judge-Executive Randy Stevens said the court had to address the issue now, as next pay period will be the first to fall under the new pay rules.

  • Sanders man charged with threatening a witness

    A Sanders man was arrested Thursday, July 2 for intimidating a participant in legal process, a class D felony, and second-degree wanton endangerment, a class A misdemeanor.

    The arrest warrant for Michael Taulbee, 20, of McDaniel Street, states he used physical force or threat of force by running Stephanie Granger off the road. In the act of running Granger off the road, the warrant states he engaged in conduct, which created a substantial danger to another.

  • Council votes to re-open alley between Taylor, Hawkins

    Carrollton City Council has reversed a decision made several years ago to re-open an alley running between Taylor and Hawkins Streets by a vote of 4-1.

    Tammy McBurney made the motion to re-open the alley with Mike Gordon seconding and Kevin Craig and Adam Raker voting in favor, with Dean Miller Jr. the lone vote in opposition.

  • Bluegrass Bash

    Even the unseasonably cool weather could not cool off the hot bluegrass talent that had strains of fiddles, mandolins and singing wafting through General Butler State Resort Park last weekend.

    The Back to the Past for the Future Bluegrass Bash featured the music of the 11 bands in town for the event that inspired a lot of toe tapping and dancing.

  • Additional road funds will assist with projects

    On Thursday, July 16, Gov. Steve Beshear said he is taking action to help hard-pressed local governments bear the cost of necessary public services. At the governor’s direction, 20 percent of a fund ordinarily spent on rural secondary roads by the state Department of Highways – about $21 million – is being set aside for use on local routes that counties have identified as priorities, according to an announcement from the governor’s public information office.

  • County funding paves road to new park fishing pier

    Carroll County Fiscal Court voted in its July 14 meeting to appropriate $8,000 to pave the gravel access road to the new fishing pier at General Butler State Resort Park.

    The fishing pier, extending into the lake at the park, provides accessibility for persons with disabilities enabling them to fish, according to Carroll County Judge-Executive Harold “Shorty” Tomlinson. The pier was funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a bureau in the Department of Interior, with some funds contributed by local agencies.

  • Father pleads ‘not guilty’ in baby-shaking incident

    Steven M. Finkel––the 21-year-old father charged with first-degree criminal abuse of his 7-week-old daughter––was arraigned in District Court, Thursday, July 9.  Finkel pleaded not guilty to the charges and a preliminary hearing was set for Thursday, July 16.

    In a separate hearing on the same day, Bridgette Saunders, Finkel’s court-appointed public defender requested a lower bond stating Finkel had no record, would be staying with his parents and would have no contact with the victim.

  • Officials confident speedway measure will benefit local area

    Area government leaders have high expectations for new legislation signed into law by Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, which provides incentives for business expansion in the state. The new measure, in part, offers tax credits for growth at nearby Kentucky Speedway in Gallatin County. Speedway officials are planning a major expansion project at the facility in connection with luring a race on the NASCAR Sprint Cup season schedule.

  • Fruits of their labor: Families reap first harvest

    Several families have taken advantage of free garden space and are beginning to harvest produce now.  

    Barry Brown, a local businessman, offered the free garden plots on his Fourth Street property in the spring. At least five people have planted, weeded and have begun harvesting many types of vegetables.   

    Barbara Denning and her son, Steven, share a plot with Debbie Younce and her son, Terry. The Dennings weeded  tomato plants on Thursday and hoped to take some green tomatoes home for frying.