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Local News

  • New JCTC building ready for school year

    What began in 1968 is finally becoming a reality in 2017. Carrollton has a new community and technical college building.

    A ribbon cutting is scheduled for 2 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 9, at the campus located on Hwy. 227, across the road from the main entrance to General Butler State Resort Park. Classes will officially begin Aug. 14.

    The state legislature approved the funding for a community college in 1968, but according to Dennis Goff there was some ‘horse-trading’ that went on and Carrollton did not receive its campus.

  • iLead, Trimble students to embrace new learning tool

    Summit Learning will be introduced to students at the iLead Academy in Carrollton and at two school facilities in Trimble County when classes begin this fall.

  • Trimble man was indicted on human trafficking

    Gallatin County Grand Jury indicted a Trimble County man July 24, on one count of human trafficking, a class C felony.

    On May 20, Kentucky State Police Post 5 Campbellsburg received a complaint of human trafficking in Gallatin County. 

  • Livingood excited for new interim role

    Carroll County Schools interim superintendent Ron Livingood, Ed.D., took over the district’s leadership position July 12. He has a one-year contract with the district as the board of education begins the search for a new superintendent.

    Livingood retired in December 2016 after serving as superintendent of Grant County Schools for more than five years.

  • TRDHD, UMC offer free snacks until Aug. 11

    The Three Rivers District Health Department has partnered with the United Methodist Church Food Ministry summer food service in Carroll County to offer free food service to all children through age 18.

    The program provides an enhanced snack for each child, health department grant writer and community development specialist Hayley Franklin said.

    The United Methodist Church Food Ministry in Owen County prepares the snacks, Franklin said, and then brings them to Carroll County Health Department in a mobile food vehicle.

  • Local officials believe data regarding youth smoking, alcohol, drug use is high

    Students responding to questions on cigarette, alcohol and other types of drug use in the 2016 Kentucky Incentive for Prevention report show higher numbers than some local officials believe to be the case.

    In fact, Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County coordinator Hayley Franklin said the numbers on usage by youth here have shown steady declines with the educational efforts and prevention programs offered here in recent years. Carrollton Police Chief Mike Willhoite agrees based on his department’s reports.

  • Council discusses park renovation, taxes

    With the new river walk extensions coming soon, Point Park is next up for a makeover. Mayor Robb Adams said a new sign has been ordered, and tree trimmers will be in town in a couple of weeks to shape up and remove some trees.

    Adams said he would like to update the basketball court, but would like to keep the existing poles. After doing some research, he found a company in South Carolina that could provide a backboard and breakaway rim for about $1,250-$1,300 each. He also wants to spray the grass, seal the cracks and spray new lines on the court.

  • Man arrested for killing dog, intoxication

    Carrollton Police Department arrested Anthony Spencer, 52, of Carrollton Thursday, July 20, and charged him with second-degree cruelty to animals; public intoxication-controlled substance (excludes alcohol) and second-degree disorderly conduct.

  • Be prepared: Register loved one in new High Risk Missing Persons Program

    Family members and caretakers of people susceptible to going missing or wandering off now have the opportunity to register their loved ones ahead of time, giving law enforcement and rescue personnel a two-hour head start on recovering them. The target audience for the High Risk Missing Persons Program includes those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, autism, mental disabilities or other physical impairments, Carrollton Police Chief Mike Willhoite said.

  • Group wants data on overseas packages

    By JAMES MAYSE

    The Messenger-Inquirer

    Opioid products like fentanyl and carfentanil, which are many times more powerful and dangerous than heroin, have become well-known by law enforcement and first-responders in Louisville, Lexington and northern Kentucky, where fatal opioid overdoses have become a public health emergency.