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Local News

  • Young Leaders learn about criminal justice system

    Amid flashing blue lights, Carroll County Sheriff Jamie Kinman placed six Carroll County High School students under arrest for the robbery of a local gas station Friday, Dec. 9.

    The arrests were part of a simulation for sophomores participating in the Young Leaders program sponsored by the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce and the Carroll County Community Development Corporation.

    County Attorney Nick Marsh planned the court system as part of the Carroll County community service day for the leadership development program.

  • Project will honor active soldiers with banners in C’ton

    Banners honoring active military, veterans and first responders may soon hang in downtown Carrollton.

    Operation Honor is a non-profit organization located in Owen County. The company hires veterans to build triangle-shaped boxes to hold the American flag and is in the process of building a warehouse, Mayor Robb Adams explained to City Council Dec. 12. To help fund this project, the organization is soliciting cities to sign on with its banner project.

  • Fiscal court looks to fill void left by CCAS decision

    Carroll County Fiscal Court opened a dialog with community volunteers about opportunities for the Carroll County Animal Shelter.

    Carroll County Animal Support announced two weeks ago that they would be suspending their volunteer work after the current set of foster dogs were moved through the rescue/adoption process.

    Carroll County Judge Bobby Lee Westrick said the court felt like it had been blindsided by the announcement.

  • Trimble Co. woman dies in hit-and-run

    Kentucky State Police investigators from Campbellsburg Post 5 are continuing to seek input from the public regarding the Dec. 8, traffic death of 28-year-old Donna Frazier on Ky. 36 in Milton. At this time there has been no arrest nor has a suspect been identified in the vehicle/pedestrian hit and run accident.

  • Taylor one of 21 DOCJT telecommunication grads

    Twenty-one law enforcement dispatchers, including Darrius Taylor of Carroll County Dispatch, graduated Nov. 18, from the Public Safety Dispatch Academy at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice Training.

    The graduates hail from communications centers across the state, and comprise DOCJT’s 109th telecommunications academy class, which first began in 1999.

  • Carroll County Animal Support to disband citing no progress at shelter

    The heart and soul of the Carroll County Animal Support group Tammie Crawford announced on the group’s Facebook page Nov. 29, that the organization would not be taking any more calls or pleas for help.

    In an interview Dec. 6, Crawford said she finally experienced burnout. “The frustration of not getting any changes at the shelter just finally got to be too much,” she said. “We saved a lot of lives, but could not make any changes.”

  • True, Hendrickson give closing arguments

    Defense: J. Guthrie True

    True called the inconclusive FBI report on Clay Cable’s initials on the KSP 41 “a game-ender,” during his closing statements to the jury Friday. He added that the FBI also could not determine whether the same person wrote everything on that line.

  • Community steps up again sending food, clothing to Smoky Mountain communities

    Carroll County is a community that responds to the call for help as recently witnessed by the support of the flooded areas of West Virginia and the water quality crisis in Flint, Mich.

    The community is stepping up again in wake of the fires in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that have affected locations that hold memories for many local folks. Hurricane force winds started a fire storm that quickly moved from Chimney Top toward the communities of Gatlinburg, Tenn. and Pigeon Forge, Tenn., forcing the evacuation of Gatlinburg.

  • KINMAN FOUND NOT GUILTY

    “Not guilty.”

    After hearing those words, Carroll County Sheriff Jamie Kinman began to cry into the arms of his attorney, J. Guthrie True.

    More than two years after his indictment and more than three years after the investigation began, Kinman was finally “free to go.”

    A jury of eight men and four women found Kinman not guilty Dec. 2, of tampering with physical evidence, specifically a KSP 41 or chain of custody form in Marcell Hankins’ case.

  • Carrollton Utilities Groundbreaking