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Regional

  • Walkers take to the streets Sept. 17, to fight suicide

    Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, yet suicide is preventable. More than 400 people from throughout Madison are expected to participate in the second annual Madison Out of the Darkness Community Walk hosted by the Indiana Chapter at 9 a.m. Sept. 17, at Bicentennial Park.

    This fundraising walk supports the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s local and national education and advocacy programs and its bold goal to reduce the annual rate of suicide 20 percent by 2025.

  • Benefit to be held Sept. 24, at Trimble

    By CHRIS BROOKS

    Landmark News Service

    Family and friends are throwing a benefit for Robert Brierly of Henry County, due to his living situation and continuing health issues, according to information from Jennifer Allgeier.

    Brierly lost his home after the death of his wife a few years ago, and he lived in a daughter’s basement until she sold her home, Allgeier said. For a little while after that, he lived in a camper.

  • Kentucky’s Open Records Law: Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Open Government

    By JOHN A. NELSON

    KPA Past President

    Government watchdogs are celebrating this month the 40th anniversary of the Kentucky Open Records Act. It has withstood the test of time as an indispensable tool for a variety of individuals and interest groups seeking to hold public officials accountable.

  • Get prepared before an emergency strikes

    No time is a good one for a natural disaster to strike. Emergencies don’t always announce themselves first and are often unexpected, leaving many of the victims in their wake stunned and without some of the most basic resources.

  • USDA announces the availability of additional farm loan funding

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency Administrator Val Dolcini Sept. 2, announced that additional funding will be made available to assist more than 1,900 approved applicants who are awaiting farm operating loans. The funds, which were reprogrammed by FSA with the approval of Congress, will leverage up to $185 million in additional lending for direct and guaranteed farm operation loans and will allow the agency to address up to 30 percent of its projected shortfall of funds until the next federal fiscal year resumes on Oct. 1.

  • Paul, Gray appear (separately) at Kentucky Farm Bureau forum

    By DANIEL DESROCHERS

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    LOUISVILLE - U.S. Sen. Rand Paul and his Democratic challenger, Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, answered questions from the Kentucky Farm Bureau about farm policy on Thursday, but not at the same time.

    It’s only the third time both candidates for an office have not appeared at the same time at the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s “Meet the Candidates” forum, according to Bureau President Mark Haney.

  • Gov. Bevin hails U.S. district judge’s bathroom ruling

    By MORGAN WATKINS

    The Courier-Journal

    Gov. Matt Bevin’s office on Monday praised a federal judge’s decision to temporarily block President Barack Obama’s administration from enforcing its guidelines on transgender students’ access to bathrooms in public schools, although civil rights groups criticized the ruling.

  • Is a police bill needed?

    By PHILLIP M. BAILEY and MORGAN WATKINS

    The Courier-Journal

    It was a low-key shift on a warm July night until Louisville Metro Police Officer DeAris Hoard got the “shots fired” call. Hoard, a 25-year-old who has spent three years on the force, had handled minor problems so far: a stolen phone, a noise complaint, a fender-bender. Then an officer saw a man fire a gun from a balcony near East Oak Street.

  • More Kentucky cities, counties OK liquor sales

    By DON WILKINS

    The Messenger-Inquirer

    Before 2016 ends, it could become one of the wettest years on record, and not because of the copious amounts of rain that have fallen this summer, but for the number of cities and counties that are voting in favor of alcohol.

  • Zika virus hits close to home in Hardin Co.

    The News-Enterprise

    It didn’t seem so scary when it was in Brazil.

    Knowing the life span of a mosquito, it was mathematically improbable for the little critter to bring the Zika virus to North America any time soon.

    But when you factor in the human element – travel, flights and transmission – what seemed improbable became plausible.

    With the news late last week that two Hardin County residents were laboratory confirmed to have contracted the virus, what was plausible now is very real.