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Regional

  • Absentee voting begins

    Eligible voters may begin casting mail-in absentee ballots in Kentucky’s May 19, Primary Election. Individuals who may be eligible to vote by mail-in absentee ballot include:

    •Military personnel, their dependents, and overseas citizens

    •Students who temporarily reside outside the county

    •Voters who temporarily reside outside Kentucky (e.g., vacationers)

    •Voters who are incarcerated but have not yet been convicted

  • New booster seat law; how to buckle in correctly

    By MIKE WYNN

    The Courier-Journal

    Starting this summer, parents will be required to keep children secured in booster seats a little longer under a new state law that aims to improve safety in motor vehicles.

    The law, enacted in this year’s legislative session, includes two key changes related to age and height that parents should heed, otherwise they could face a $25 fine.

  • Remember importance of dialing 8-1-1 during National Safe Digging Month

    As part of April’s “National Safe Digging Month,” Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company urge customers to dial 8-1-1, the Federal Communication Commission’s designated call-before-you-dig number, to identify buried lines that could be damaged as a result of excavation work.

  • Banner editor pens Christian music history

    By TEENA DRAKE

    Landmark News Service

    The latest publication from the pen of author Dave Taylor, also known as Managing Editor of The Trimble Banner, has been released by LexingtonHaus Publications and Amazon.

    “Happy Rhythm: A Biography of Hovie Lister and the Statesmen Quartet” is the third and final edition of a book first published in 1994. A hardback edition was published in 1998 on the 50th anniversary of the gospel vocal group’s founding. Both previous editions sold out years ago.

  • Backyard politics: Scott stands out as other GOP gubernatorial candidates struggle to distinguish themselves during recent Oldham County debate

    By RAE HODGE

    Landmark News Service

    Only hours after Kentucky’s junior Sen. Rand Paul, announced his bid for the U.S. presidency from the lavish perch of Louisville’s historic Galt House, the wooden pews of LaGrange Baptist Church were filled with the faithful. 

  • Court case elevates bullying problems

    Kentucky New Era

    A case before the Kentucky Supreme Court could lead to a legal precedent that determines when school teachers and administrators have to bear responsibility for a bullied student’s suicide.

    The court heard arguments last week in a lawsuit filed by a Floyd County family whose 13-year-old son shot himself to death at home in 2007. Stephen Patton’s mother says teachers, a principal and two superintendents knew her son was bullied but did not intervene to help him.

  • AG warns of scam targetting seniors

    Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway and the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services Department for Aging and Independent Living is warning consumers of a reported scam targeting Kentucky’s seniors.

  • Ky. Pearl Harbor survivor honored

    By Lauren P. Duncan

    The Paducah Sun

    Livingston County resident Karl Monday has shared the story of Pearl Harbor many times since surviving the attack 73 years ago.

    Monday, 92, recounted it again during a ceremony Friday in Paducah, where U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield and Gov. Steve Beshear thanked the veteran for his service and presented him with an American flag and three citations.

  • Ky. farmers working toward creating a Kentucky Cloth

    By Janet Patton

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    Now that Kentucky can grow hemp again, the next step is figuring out what to do with it.

    A new project, a cooperative effort among local producers, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and a California non-profit called Fibershed, has a possible answer with its plan to blend hemp with wool and alpaca fiber, all from Kentucky farmers.

  • ‘Stakes high’ as lawmakers seek late heroin deal

    By Tom Loftus and Mike Wynn

    The Courier-Journal

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky legislators pledged to avoid a repeat of 2014: Amid a deadly epidemic, a major bill to fight heroin collapses on the House floor only minutes before adjournment.

    Now after months of debate, they are cutting it close.

    The 2015 General Assembly returns March 23 with two days left to address the lethal flood of heroin that is anguishing families and claiming hundreds of lives each year in Kentucky.