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Regional

  • Ohio, Kentucky could get up to $63 million for heroin, opioid treatment

    By Terry DeMio

    The Kentucky Enquirer

    Ohio and Kentucky stand to get an estimated $63 million in federal money for heroin and opioid addiction treatment if President Barack Obama gets his way.

    Both states rank in the top five in the nation for drug poisoning deaths per 100,000 population.

    Kentucky was fourth in 2014, with 24.7 drug poisoning deaths per 100,000 population. Ohio was right behind, ranking fifth with 24.6, the White House noted in its announcement of the treatment funding proposal on Tuesday.

  • Unidentified: Woman’s case remains unsolved after 28 years

    By MOLLY HAINES

    Landmark News Service

    On May 6, 1988, Kentucky State Police discovered the remains of a young woman – she laid naked in an open field on Highway 330, her face decomposed beyond recognition – the cause of death was determined as strangulation.

    The discovery received little press. A May 12, 1988 edition of the News-Herald reported that an unidentified white female was discovered approximately 18 miles south of Owenton, 27 feet off the roadway.

  • Companies spend record $9.53 million lobbying Kentucky

    By Jack Brammer

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    FRANKFORT - Companies and special interest groups spent an all-time high of $9.53 million lobbying Kentucky’s 2016 General Assembly, the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission reported Tuesday.

    That’s a 9 percent increase over lobbyist spending in 2014, the most recent 60-day lawmaking session.

    During this year’s session, a record 698 businesses and organizations registered to lobby. That is 5 percent more than in 2014.

  • Louisville vet living in shadow of Iwo Jima

    By Chris Kenning

    Courier-Journal

    Bill Hildebrand was in his 80s when the phone rang in his Middletown ranch house.

    “Were you on LCI-449?” a voice on the line asked.

    The name of his World War II ship stopped the retired electrician short. It had been more than 60 years since he went through a “horrific” experience in the lead-up to Iwo Jima, one of the Pacific’s bloodiest battles.

    “Yes, I was,” a surprised Hildebrand replied.

  • Lower smoking rate could save state billions

    By MELISSA PATRICK and DAVID ZOELLER

    The Paducah Sun

    If Kentucky could cut its smoking rate to the national average, it would save an estimated $1.7 billion on health care the following year, according to a study from the University of California-San Francisco.

  • Two killed in Carroll County wreck on I-71

    Two people were killed and another seriously injured during the early morning hours of Wednesday May 11, in a single vehicle accident on I-71 in Carroll County.
    Kentucky State Police dispatchers received a call at 1:58 a.m. Wednesday morning of a single vehicle collision on I-71 at the 39 mile marker northbound, according to a news release.  

  • Interim Healthcare employee indicted for controlled substance charges                                                                         

    A criminal investigation into the theft of prescription drugs in Owen County led to the indictment of a Trimble County woman for providing false information to obtain narcotics.

    Lisa V. Temple, 38 of Milton, a registered nurse at Interim Healthcare in Carrollton, was indicted April 8, for prohibited acts relating to controlled substances. The charges stemmed from acts allegedly committed by Temple between Oct. 30 and Nov. 8, 2015, in which she knowingly misrepresented or withheld information from a practitioner in order to obtain controlled substances.

  • Tuition increases capped at 4.6 to 6.1 percent for Kentucky schools

    By LINDA BLACKFORD

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    Kentucky’s public universities and colleges will be limited to tuition increases that range between 4.6 percent and 6.1 percent next school year for in-state undergraduate students, the Council on Postsecondary Education decided Tuesday.

  • Bevin launches probe of ‘questionable activities’ in Beshear administration

    By JACK BRAMMER

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    FRANKFORT - Gov. Matt Bevin said Tuesday his staff has uncovered evidence that officials in former Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration “failed to meet the high standards that the law and people of Kentucky demand from state government officials.”

    He ordered Finance and Administration Secretary William Landrum to hire investigators to conduct a wide-ranging inquiry of actions taken by Beshear administration officials. He also said the FBI might be looking into some of the matters.

  • Bill to teach CPR will benefit society

    By JIM PAXTON
    The Paducah Sun
    Kentucky is on course to become the 28th state to require all of its high school students to be taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation before graduating.