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Regional

  • Stucker, Whalen join KSP Post 5

    The Kentucky State Police Academy presented diplomas to 40 new troopers at ceremonies held July 6 in Frankfort. Their addition to the force brings the agency’s strength to a total of 948 troopers serving the citizens of the Commonwealth.

    Post 5 in Campbellsburg, which serves Carroll, Trimble Gallatin, Henry, Oldham, and Owen counties, added two new troopers: Patrick Stucker of Bardstown, Ky., and Matthew Whalen of LaGrange, Ky.

  • State prepares for an aging population

     Like the rest of the nation, Kentucky is seeing a definite graying trend as more and more Baby Boomers move past their 65th birthday and a growing number of citizens reach their nineties and beyond.

  • Kentucky’s backward policy on ex-felon voting should change

     From the Lexington Herald-Leader

    Each election season, responsible citizens loudly bemoan — as they should — low voter turnout.

    In the Kentucky primary this May, only 14 percent of registered voters exercised their privilege.

    Equally discouraging — but more easily remedied — is that a huge number of Kentuckians did not even have that privilege.

  • Oh, the irony of it all

     From The News-Enterprise

     

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent 5-4 decision upholding the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was, in a word, ironic. Moreover, it provides the Obama administration, his Oval Office challenger Mitt Romney, and congressional politicians on both sides of the aisle what they wanted — at least for now.

    First, the irony of the court’s ruling.

  • Ethics commission’s proposals offer solid plan for next session

     From the Lexington Herald-Leader

    In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was a not-so-nice king condemned to spend eternity rolling a boulder up a hill only to have it roll back down again before he could reach the top.

    In recent years, members of Kentucky’s Legislative Ethics Commission may have gained a little empathy for poor Sisyphus and his perpetual exercise in futility.

    Each year lately, the commission has submitted a well-reasoned set of recommended changes in the ethics law to the General Assembly.

  • Speedway flashback
  • Lock construction key to opening up Ky River

    By Kevin Wheatley

    The State Journal

    The gates at Lock 4 are being repaired as part of an ongoing project to reopen more than 60 miles of the Kentucky River from Frankfort to the Ohio River.

    The Kentucky River Authority is using $4 million in excess construction funds for repairs at locks 1, 2, 3 and 4 within the next two years, according to KRA Executive Director Jerry Graves.

    The project will open 64 miles of the river from Frankfort to Carrollton boat traffic, Graves said.

  • New Kentucky laws go into effect July 12, include copper theft, meth labs

     Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT - New laws approved during the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2012 regular session go into effect on July 12.

    That means passengers in large vans will soon be required to buckle up. Copper thieves won’t be able to sell stolen materials for quick cash at recycling centers. And meth producers will have a harder time getting large amounts of a key ingredient needed to make their illegal drugs, according to a news release from the Legislative Research Commission.

  • New section of Milton-Madison Bridge lifted onto temporary piers this week

    By DAVE TAYLOR

    Landmark News Service

    Lift preparations were still under way at press time Tuesday in anticipation of “strand-jacking” the first truss section of the new Milton-Madison Bridge onto its temporary piers.

    The procedure began early Monday when, with the assistance of several tug boats, the 600-foot span, constructed on barges docked on the Milton side of the Ohio River, was floated from the shoreline to the base of the temporary piers, downstream of the existing bridge.

  • The Amish: keeping life simple

    By Brad Bowman

    Landmark News Service

    Amos and David Troyer’s family want to live the old-fashioned way. Not just because they are Amish, but because they want to keep life simple.

    Buggies frequently travel U.S. 421 and along the back roadways in Henry County. They are just as much a part of our rural landscape as tractors and hay wagons. The Amish are often seen, but, as a people, are not always heard.