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Today's News

  • iLEAD Academy wins KSBA PEAK award

    The Kentucky School Boards Association presented Carroll, Gallatin, Henry, Owen and Trimble county school district officials with the Public Education Achieves in Kentucky (PEAK) Award Wednesday, Nov. 29, at the iLEAD Academy, located at 2557 Hwy. 227 in Carrollton.

    The PEAK Award, given twice yearly, was established in 1997 to focus statewide attention on outstanding public school efforts that enhance student learning skills and promote the positive impact of public elementary and secondary education in Kentucky.

  • The hunt of a lifetime

    The Wyoming Game and Fish Director awarded only 10 Super Tags as part of an annual raffle created by the state’s lawmakers providing hunters additional opportunities to obtain difficult to draw hunting licenses and raise money for wildlife management in Wyoming.

    Shawn Keeton was one of 10 to win a Super Tag, and only one of five to win from outside the state. The Super Tag program holds individual raffles for bighorn sheep, moose, mountain goat, elk, wild bison, deer, antelope, black bear and mountain lion licenses. Keeton won the elk Super Tag.

  • Zone causes fits; Aulbach shines with 25 points and 19 rebounds

    The young Trimble County Lady Raiders came out swinging Friday night, but were tripped up by Carroll County’s zone, as the Lady Panthers won the game, 45-33, Dec. 1. Carroll County senior Abigail Aulbach had a huge night, posting 25 points and 19 rebounds to lead both teams.

  • Cole scores game-high 23 as Panthers roll to win

    Carroll County took round one of the Carroll-Trimble border war with a 75-59 win over the visiting Raiders.

    Carroll jumped out to an early 8-0 lead as freshman Keishaun Mumphrey started the scoring with a pair of free throws, sophomore Wyatt Supplee scored four points and senior Braedyn Cole added a basket to complete the run.

    Sophomore Reese Webster knocked down a three-pointer for Trimble’s first points.

  • Girls welcome new head coach; look to run an up-tempo style

    The Carroll County Lady Panthers open the 2017-18 season with a new head coach at the helm, as Ron Henderson takes over for CCHS athletic director Paul Stone. Henderson has 11 years of girls basketball coaching experience in Oldham County, including as the Oldham County High School JV head coach.

  • Crank sees Panthers displaying ‘improved team chemistry’

    Carroll County boys basketball head coach Brian Crank was shaking his head after basketball practice, Nov. 20. “We did some good things at our Nov. 18 scrimmage at Covington Holy Cross,” Crank said. “Then we came out and had an awful practice today, no one was focused.”

    Crank said he was pleased with scrimmage, especially the second half. “They listened at half time and rebounded better, played better defense and reduced the number of turnovers,” he said. “All the things a team has to do win.”

  • BOE discusses superintendent search, creates the timeline

    The Carroll County Board of Education set the timeline for selecting a new superintendent at a working meeting, Dec 4.

    The board said they would like to have someone selected and hired by May 15, 2018. Don Martin from the Kentucky School Board Association said he thought that would be good timing as the school year is almost over and it would be easier for someone to transition out of their current situation. He also said that would give the new superintendent six weeks of overlap with interim superintendent Ron Livingood.

  • Main Street, council aim to attract new businesses downtown

    Carrollton Main Street Program presented a proposal to Carrollton City Council aimed at incentivizing new small businesses to open downtown.

  • Report: 1,176 public workers in Kentucky took paid leave to vote–but they didn’t

    By JACK BRAMMER

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    More than 1,300 public employees in Kentucky claimed four hours of paid leave to vote in two recent elections but were not entitled to the benefit, costing taxpayers more than $102,000, state Auditor Mike Harmon said Tuesday.

  • Kentucky Coroner’s Association seeks drug disposal system

    By ZAC OAKES

    Central Kentucky News-Journal

    A little-known aspect of a county coroner’s job duties has been gaining some recognition around the state, as the Kentucky Coroner’s Association is lobbying for legislation that creates a state protocol for how county coroners are to handle the disposal of drugs recovered from a death scene.

    Taylor County Coroner Daniel Cook said this is a relatively unknown aspect of his job as Taylor County coroner.