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Today's News

  • Girls’ group provides focus on technology, mathematics, science

    As part of the district-wide push to encourage more students to take high-level Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) classes, a new club at Carroll County Middle School has been designed with girls in mind. This “girls-only” club will meet twice monthly starting in the 2014-2015 school year.

  • Student of the week: Jacy Hoffman, 10th grade

    What is your favorite thing about school and why?

    “My favorite thing about school is socializing! Without my friends, I’d be lost.”

    What is your favorite subject and why?

    “My favorite subject is Human Body Systems because it’s so interesting and such an amazing opportunity. Mr. Boles does an amazing job at preparing me for the future.”

    What was the last book you read? 

    “Night Elie Wiesel”

  • Carroll softball wins at Eminence

    The Lady Panthers softball team defeated Eminence in a doubleheader by scores of 17-0, 15-0, on March 20 at Eminence. Cheyenne Lawrence was the winning pitcher in game one, while Michaela Culver won game two. Carroll (4-0) plays Shelby County on the road Thursday before competing in the Oldham County Spring Break Classic Friday and Saturday.

  • Thompson earns doctorate

    Southern Illinois University Carbondale has conferred upon Marie Thompson the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English Literature. Thompson earned a M.A. in English Literature at Eastern Kentucky University and a B.A. in History at Northern Kentucky University.  She graduated from the Christian Academy of Carrollton in 2000. She currently teaches for the Kentucky Community and Technical College System.

  • Retired teachers group membership increases

    Carroll County Retired Teachers Association met March 21 at Two Rivers Restaurant with eight members present.

    Minutes from the last meeting were read by secretary Velma Hunt and approved. The treasurer’s report included a donation to the Carroll County Public Library in memory of Mary Broberg.

  • Tappin’ the sap

    Misty Kinman’s Wolf Scout Den attended the Sugar Camp Feb. 27, at Middleton-Mills Park in Northern Kentucky. Field Programs on Fowler Creek proprietor Mike Strohm operates the working sugar camp, demonstrating the art and science of making maple sugar. He portrays American pioneer settler Elrod Tapper and shows visitors what it was like living in the mid-1800s. A second camp was set up nearby offering participants the opportunity to help process sap into hard sugar, using hot rocks and wooden bowls, as Shawnee and Iroquois Indians would have done in the 1700s.

  • Carrollton City Council | March 24, 2014

    City employees, elected officials receive 3 percent raise

    Carrollton City Council approved Monday the first reading of an ordinance establishing the salary scale for fiscal year 2014-15 and replacing the existing salary scale. This represents a 3 percent raise across the board for all city employees beginning July 1, 2014.

  • Carroll County District Court | March 27, 2014

    Items published in court news are public record. The News-Democrat publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published. Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to the News-Democrat do not imply guilt.

    DISTRICT COURT

    The following decisions were rendered Wednesday and Thursday, March 19-20, 2014, in Carroll County District Court with the Hon. Thomas Funk presiding.

  • Honoring Crawford

     

  • JCTC Carrollton campus must be funded this year

    As Carroll County Judge-Executive Harold “Shorty” Tomlinson said Tuesday, “so far, so good.”

    Funding for the new Jefferson Community and Techinal College campus in Carrollton has cleared hurdle, after hurdle this year.

    Gov. Steve Beshear included the project in his budget as part of a plan to invest in community colleges because they help put Kentuckians to work.