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Today's News

  • Truth and Consequences educates students about results of poor decisions

    At the end of March community partners in Carroll County will hold an event called Truth and Consequences.

    The event is a program that is derived from Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service in Clinton County, Ky., and is used across the state in many counties. This year Carroll County’s Exten-sion Office partnered up with County Schools, Youth Services, Lighthouse and others to bring a community and school based event.

  • Raises discussed to help gain, retain police officers

    Carrollton City Council is working to address the problem of how to retain its current police officers and how to attract new ones. In order to achieve these goals, Mayor Robb Adams and council members Mike Gordon, Kevin Craig and Jeffrey Dickow discussed at the budget work session March 21, the possibility of offering raises–either for just the police department or for all city employees. This would be in addition to the up to 4 percent across the board raise already budgeted for fiscal year 2017-2018.

  • Preliminary budget includes funding for splash park, city hall renovations, raises

    A possible splash park at Point Park, new streetlights along Hwy. 227 and city hall building improvements topped Carrollton City Council’s annual budget meetings with department heads March 20-21, at city hall in preparation of passing the fiscal year 2017-2018 budget. The budget will undergo a first and second reading prior to June 30, before it is finalized.

  • Live Your Passion - E Elvis Artist - Greg Damron

    He’s created close to 100 pieces of artwork and has met an estimated 180-190 Elvis Presley tribute artists. He has been to the Graceland mansion four times and wears two Elvis-related rings every day on his right hand.

    It’s safe to say that Greg Damron is a HUGE Elvis Presley fan.

    “I’m a big Elvis fan, but I don’t think I’m obsessed,” he said. “Now if you talk to someone else, you might get the obsessed. I’m a big, big fan, borderline obsessed.”

  • Williams shines on the national stage

    By MOLLY HAINES

    Landmark News Service

    Once a Rebel, always a Rebel.

    The phrase expresses pride in being an alumnus of Owen County High School. That phrase resonated Friday night when Northern Kentucky University freshman and 2016 OCHS graduate Carson Williams led the NKU Norse against the University of Kentucky in the first round of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament.

  • CU, first responders attend pipeline training

    Above ground utilities catch peoples’ attention as they see them every day. Underground utilities tend to be forgotten, unless there is problem.

    Detection of underground problems, such as leaks or natural breaks in pipelines, are often delayed until the symptoms reach the surface.

  • Mullins joins News-Democrat staff

    Perry Park resident Renee Mullins has joined the staff of The News-Democrat and The Trimble Banner as the newspapers’ new circulation coordinator.

    Mullins most recently worked at the Carroll County Memorial Hospital, handling accounts receivable for patients, before starting at The News-Democrat, March 6.

    She has always worked in customer service and accounting, bringing those key skills and experience to the job.

  • Ghent commissioners vote again to enact ordinances not published

    The city of Ghent has taken steps to finalize several ordinances that had been voted on and passed in 2016, but never published to make them official.

    The city had a turbulent year in 2016, being without a city clerk much of the time. During this period, city leaders have determined that they failed to publish the ordinances commissioners had voted to adopt, which is the final step in passing each of them.

  • House majority leaders limited discussion on new charter schools

    Fifteen minutes – that’s how long the new House Majority let opponents to charter schools discuss a last-minute funding bill that will siphon money from our public schools for years to come.

    It was an 11th-hour sneak attack on March 15th, offered in the final moments of the final day for passing legislation. It was certainly not the first assault on the democratic process during the 2017 session, but it’s the one with the most potential for damaging the future of Kentucky’s school children.

  • Session proved very productive on issues

    Early mornings turned to late nights and spirited debate echoed through the House and Senate chambers as we closed in on the final days of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. A flurry of bills were sent to Governor Matt Bevin’s desk this week, highlighted by measures to empower our Kentucky teachers and create better learning environments for our Kentucky students.