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Today's News

  • How secure is Kentucky Speedway’s hold on its NASCAR Sprint Cup date?

    By Mark Story

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    Just four years after the Sprint Cup Series finally came to Kentucky Speedway, should NASCAR fans in the commonwealth be concerned about losing the long-sought Cup date?

    Noting the ample number of empty seats at Kentucky Speedway for the Quaker State 400, then harkening back to the Car-mageddon traffic fiasco in Sparta in 2011, Charlotte Observer motorsports writer Jim Utter raised the prospect that Bruton Smith’s Speedway Motorsports, Inc., might move Kentucky’s Cup date to Las Vegas.

  • Campaigns for U.S. Senate and governor collide in Kentucky

    By Sam Youngman

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    As Robert Duvall says in Days of Thunder, “rubbin’, son, is racing.”

    So even though two drivers might be on the same racing team, it’s still every driver for himself, and herself, when the flag drops.

    That’s also the case in Kentucky politics these days, as Democrats trade paint with other Democrats, and Republicans risk a potential two-year pile-up.

  • Pickle time: Canning preserves tasty summer favorites

    There is nothing that sets off a summer sandwich, hot dog or burger better than the taste of a pickle. With so many varieties, you are bound to find one to suit your preference. Pickles are popular home food preservation items.

    To ensure safe, tasty home-canned pickles, always follow research-based recipes, such as those offered by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service that have been tested for product safety.

  • Cooler weather trend can affect vegetables, plantings

    Summer gardens are in full swing right now. Sweet corn is coming in, tomatoes are ripening, and it makes my mouth water just thinking about it.

    As we enjoy our scrumptious bounty from the garden, it is time to start planning how you can continue to enjoy your garden and even add new plantings. Planting a variety of produce in the garden in the coming weeks allows fresh items to be available well into the fall.

  • Most new laws take effect July 15

    A common misconception about the legislative process is that all state laws take effect right after the governor signs them.

    While that assumption is understandable, the truth is that most laws are not official until 90 days after the end of a legislative session. This year, that date falls on July 15.

    There are some exceptions. If a law addresses a pressing need – as we saw this spring with the problem many school districts had regarding an excessive number of snow days – the fix the General Assembly passes can take effect immediately.

  • Cellphones seem to have our number

    By Leigh Landini Wright

    Reprinted from The Paducah Sun

    Eyes up.

    Chances are if you followed the Murray State University men’s basketball team during the past two years, you’ve seen Coach Steve Prohm’s two-word mantra trending on social media or mentioned in news stories. Those words, drawn from the Bible, are meant to keep his players focused.

  • CCHS volleyball hosts first alumni scrimmage Aug. 7

    Carroll County High School will host its first volleyball alumni scrimmage on Thursday, Aug. 7. The event will begin at 7 p.m. with the alumni squaring off against the Lady Panthers varsity squad and will conclude with an 8 p.m. game, alumni versus alumni. The games will follow KHSAA guidelines for varsity volleyball contests.

  • State Police hike Grand Canyon to raise funds for Trooper Memorial
  • Free quarterly legal update offered

    The Northern Kentucky Society for Human Resource Management is hosting a free quarterly legal update from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 15, at DBL Law, located at 207 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills, Ky., 41017. The topic will be the liability of the untrained manager.

    The guest speaker is Kelly A. Schoening, an attorney for DBL Law, who represents private and public employers in all facets of employment law.

  • Medicaid eligibility creates issue for some seniors

    By Andrea Moore

    Paducah Sun

    Baby boomers are now facing their golden years and, according to some attorneys, many are worried about how their estates will affect their Medicaid eligibility and long-term care.

    Joe Harvey Kimmel, a Paducah attorney, has seen a significant increase in the need for elder law services, specifically relating to Medicaid and Veterans Affairs long-term care planning.

    “It can be devastating when someone needing treatment at a long-term care facility is disqualified from receiving Medicaid,” Kimmel said.