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Today's News

  • Baseball awards

    Carroll County High School recently held its annual awards

    banquet at the high school cafeteria.

    Not pictured: Evan McMahan, Coaches Award, and Tyler Stewart, Most Improved 

  • Soccer Camp

    Carroll County High School soccer will host its annual soccer camp beginning Sunday, July 24, and continuing the next four Sundays (through Aug. 21). Camp will be held from 2-5 p.m. at the high school field. Cost is $25 for U-8, U-10 and U-12. Camp will be one hour for U-6 and cost $15. Campers can register the day of camp. 

  • Soccer Camp

    Carroll County High School soccer will host its annual soccer camp beginning Sunday, July 24, and continuing the next four Sundays (through Aug. 21). Camp will be held from 2-5 p.m. at the high school field. Cost is $25 for U-8, U-10 and U-12. Camp will be one hour for U-6 and cost $15. Campers can register the day of camp. 

  • Bridge weight limit change to affect commercial traffic

    “This is a catastrophe for our county,” Carroll County Judge-Executive Bobby Lee Westrick said at the Fiscal Court meeting, July 12. “The Kentucky Department of Transportation basically shut down a major artery for our county without any warning when they placed an 8-ton weight limit on the Prestonville Bridge.”

    Westrick said he was notified at about 4:17 p.m. Monday, July 11, that the weight limit of the Prestonville Bridge over the Kentucky River would be lowered from 31 tons to 8 tons (16,000 pounds).

  • City of Ghent celebrates 200 years with festival

    The city of Ghent is celebrating its 200-year anniversary by hosting a bicentennial celebration July 23, in downtown. Organizers hope it will remind residents of the old Ghent Open Air Days, which was later called River Boat Days, and kick start it into becoming an annual event again.

  • Kroger hosts NASCAR driver Patrick, donates $1,000 to local food pantry

    Before hitting the track at the Kentucky Speedway Saturday for the Quaker State 400, NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Danica Patrick competed in a grocery cart race July 7, at Carrollton’s Kroger. Patrick joined sponsor Nature’s Bakery’s president and founder Dave Marson and Carroll County representatives in a race to see who could fill up their mini grocery cart the fastest with items in their particular aisle.

  • Where Everyone Knows Your Name | Misty Stephens

    At age 21, Misty Stephens had no idea that getting her tongue pierced would be a life-altering decision. She and a friend went together, and, of course, it was painful. She asked her friend for some medicine, but she didn’t have any. Her friend had been in a car wreck and offered her some methodone. She poured a small amount and some water into a plastic bottle with a snap lid and told Misty to shake it up and not to taste it, just swallow it. It looked like the pink bubble gum medicine you had as a kid, Misty said, and she did as instructed.

  • Young wins statewide award

    Robert Young of Carroll County received the Kentucky Association for Gerontology’s Thoroughbred Award, June 14, at the inaugural Optimal Aging conference in Louisville, Ky. The award was created to recognize extraordinary efforts by individuals aged 60 or older, on behalf of the older people of Kentucky and the nation. It is the most prestigious award conferred by the association and is only awarded when a truly deserving candidate is nominated.

  • Hays assumes top job leading local hospital

    Carroll County Memorial Hospital’s new chief executive officer Harry Hays is excited about planting roots in the rural hospital setting offered at Carroll County Memorial Hospital.

    Hays began his hospital administration career more than 28 years ago with his four-year Army ROTC scholarship commitment.

  • Halfway to Hazard hosts benefit concert July 15

    The West Virginia Flood Relief effort will have a benefit concert Friday, July 15 from noon to 5 p.m. at Earl Floyd Ford. Headlining the event will be the country duo, Halfway to Hazard.

    The duo’s website describes Halfway to Hazard as no-holds barred, nothing held back, pedal to metal, all the way. It is music that is honest, open, gritty and rough around the edges by musicians who make no excuses for who they are or apologies for where they’re from. They’re Halfway to Hazard, and they’re taking the long way home.