.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Minimum structures, manufactured homes discussed

    Carrollton Planning and Zoning requested City Council consider adding a minimum structure size in the city’s zoning code for new buildings in the three residential zones, Code Enforcement Official John Welch said. Currently, there is a maximum size, but not a minimum. The issue was brought up because there have already been residents inquiring about living in “tiny houses” or similar structures within the city limits.

  • Seat belt policy adopted; roads discussed at Fiscal Court

    A Kentucky Association of Counties workman’s compensation review of the Carroll County’s garage policies found the facility did not have seat belt use policy in place.

    To address the issue, Carroll County Judge-Executive Bobby Lee Westrick presented a new policy at Fiscal County’s meeting Tuesday, Nov. 28. It states that all county garage employees need to be wearing a seat belt when operating any county owned equipment, and any other personnel in a piece of equipment also needed to be wearing a seat belt. Fiscal Court adopted the policy.

  • Contractor indicted on theft charges

    Besides a Kentucky State Police investigation that resulted in indictments being issued against a Campbellsburg-based contractor in four counties, Jason Whitaker and his construction company face lawsuits from three separate parties seeking monetary awards in Henry County Circuit Court.

    Grand juries in Henry, Trimble, Carroll and Oldham counties indicted Whitaker on charges of theft by failure to make required disposition of property, $10,000 or more, after he allegedly failed to complete contracting jobs, according to a news release from state police.

  • What do you want to do when you grow up?

    By WILL YAGER

    Spark Academy Instructor

    As part of Spark Academy at Carroll County High School, over the past three weeks students were out and about within the community job shadowing. Providing opportunities with career exploration was a key component in establishing Spark.

    Students spent a couple of hours a day for one week shadowing at a place of interest based on a survey that was taken early in the school year. They will have another placement during the Spring Semester in another area of possible interest.

  • Officials seek answers after Hwy. 355 bridge damaged

    By MOLLY HAINES

    Landmark News Service

    The bridge across Severn Creek on Hwy. 355 in Gratz is closed until further notice, and local officials are seeking answers after the bridge received significant damages last week.

    The bridge was initially restricted to 6,000 pounds, or the weight of an average car, Saturday morning after Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis received notice of the damage.

  • Nucor donates $15,000 to Ohio Valley Charities
  • Rotary donates $1,500 to Polio Plus
  • Report shows challenges facing law enforcement

    To get a better understanding of what our law enforcement officers do every day, all one has to do is flip through two comprehensive reports that the Kentucky State Police compile annually on serious crimes and traffic accidents.

  • Shopping local has a huge impact

    By MICHAEL CALDWELL

    The Jessamine Journal

    By now most people are making that list and checking it twice, channeling their inner Santa Claus.

    Many people can tell you exactly how many shopping days remain until Christmas. Others, like myself, have lots of people to buy for still.

    Hopefully everyone will try to match up that shopping list with local stores that can meet those needs.

    Shopping local is critical to our community as small businesses are the lifeblood that truly keep us strong.

  • Dance team hosts clinic Dec. 6-8

    Come dance with the Carroll County High School Dance team. They will be hosting a three-day dance clinic, Dec. 6-8, and the campers will perform at halftime of the Carroll County Lady Panthers’ basketball game on Dec. 8.

    Carroll County dance team coach Jennifer Crowell said the students would learn a performance dance, popular line dances and receive a t-shirt. The camp is open to students from 6-12 years of age.