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Today's News

  • House OKs increase in minimum wage

    Seven years after the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly to raise the state’s minimum wage, the Kentucky House of Representatives returned to the issue on Thursday when it passed legislation that follows a similar path taken by that 2007 law.

    This is an issue that is drawing a lot of attention across the country. The National Conference of State Legislatures says 23 states considered raising it in 2013, and Kentucky is one of 20 doing the same this year, with more expected in the months ahead.

  • Plan now for seeding, hay production for max profit

    As winter remains to have a strong hold in the county, each day we inch closer to spring and warmer temperatures. In addition, we inch closer to seeding dates for a variety of forages for the upcoming growing season.

    Cash hay sales can be an income source for many Ken-tucky farmers.  Check out these management tips that can help you generate the most profit from your hay enterprise from Dr. Garry Lacefield, University of Kentucky Extension Forage Specialist:

  • Senate seeks to save public funds and assist agriculture

    February opened with snow and ice across most of Kentucky. I hope you and yours are safe. As crews are out working all hours of the night, and utility workers restoring power to the many areas that lost it, I am reminded of, and appreciate, the people that are out working in these tough and hazardous conditions.

    Despite the tough conditions in travel, the Senate continued working with a full week of committee hearings and bills that came to the Senate floor for vote.

  • $10 Ag Tag benefits youth through donations to 4-H

    Kentucky 4-H is one of the most important and influential youth programs in our state and our county. Across Kentucky more than 238,000 youth ages 9 to 19 learn about leadership, citizenship and life skills in “learn-by-doing” experiences such as communications and public speaking, through agriculture projects like livestock judging, science projects with robotics, 4-H camp, Teen Conference and many other 4-H programs and activities.

  • Fruits and vegetables or juice?

    Among the most well-established and accepted nutritional advice from health professionals is to eat more fruits and vegetables. Juicing, the latest and greatest thing to hit the market is encouraging consumers to eat — or rather, drink — your daily fruits and vegetables through juices made yourself. Is this new “juicing” trend actually worth it?

    First, know the difference between a smoothie and juicing. These two processes are different and the nutritional value and health benefits are different.

  • Snow crews face limited supplies to battle winter

    Local and state road crews scramble for salt as winter continues to rear its ugly head in Carroll County and across the country.

    Carrollton Public Works supervisor Ronnie Knight said Friday that the city was almost completely out of salt after the snow Sunday, Feb. 2. Crews began working at about 3 a.m. Sunday and continued salting and plowing into Monday’s workday, using about 30 tons of salt. The city has three trucks for salting and plowing, and it typically takes about three hours to go over all of the city streets once, Knight said.

  • Race for the Top Job

    The five candidates running for Carroll County judge-executive were put to their first test of the campaign season during a debate Tuesday night in the cafeteria at Cartmell Elementary School.

  • Scholarship opens doors for Reardon

    Jordan Reardon knew after graduation he wanted a good job that put his skills in science and math to work. However, he didn’t like the thought of borrowing large sums of money to secure a four-year college degree.

    A scholarship opportunity through the Carroll County Training Consortium was the answer. It helped him develop his skills and secure a good job at Dow Corning Carrollton site.

  • CCAS to begin opening county shelter in March

    Beginning March 1, volunteers with Carroll County Animal Support will begin opening the county shelter on Boone Road to allow area residents to adopt dogs.

    The volunteer program cleared its final hurdle at the Tuesday, Feb. 11 Carroll County Fiscal Court meeting as the county agreed to pay $267.18 for liability insurance that will allow a volunteer program to operate at the shelter, if the policy meets with the county attorney’s approval.

  • SelfRefind to pay $15.75 million fine for unnecessary tests, alleged fraud

    A chain of opiate addiction recovery centers that operates a clinic in Carrollton and a Russell Springs clinical laboratory, along with two physician owners, agreed to pay the U.S. government millions of dollars to resolve civil allegations that they fraudulently billed federal health care programs for medically unnecessary and excessive urine tests.