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Today's News

  • Two fires burn three Carrollton homes, result in excessive damage, no injuries

    Blasts of water smothered the orange flames, and black smoke turned to grayish white as Carrollton firefighters fought to save two homes on Fisher Avenue Sunday night. This was the second house fire call the department, along with Westside Volunteer Fire Department through mutual aid, responded to in the past week — the other being on Sixth Street.

  • Fire department responds to Fisher Avenue house fire

    Carrollton Fire Department responded to a house fire at 1605 Fisher Ave. in Carrollton Sunday night. The fire spread to the neighboring house, 1603 Fisher Ave. There were no people injured, but two dogs died in the fire, according to the resident's mother and owner. Westside Volunteer Fire Department, Carrollton Police Department and Carroll County Sheriff's Office were also on scene. More information will be reported in Wednesday's paper.

  • News briefs

    Fiscal court approves increase
    for fall election workers

    Carroll County Fiscal Court voted Tuesday, April 12 to increase the amount the county pays election workers for training and working election day. Beginning with the election this November, workers will receive $25 for training and $100 for election day. Judge-Executive Harold “Shorty” Tomlinson said the county is currently paying $10 for training and $90 for election day. The difference will amount to $3,600, he said.

  • FNB offers free document shredding Friday

    A free shred day event is set for April 22 at First National Bank of Carrollton in celebration of Earth Day.
    Working with Cintas Corp., the leader in secure document management services, First National Bank, 604 Highland Ave. in Carrollton, is offering local residents the opportunity to safely shred confidential personal and business documents.

  • Beef quality assurance certification class set for April 21

    Producers who will need to be Beef Quality Assured in order to sell beef at certain sales and to meet the requirements for some of the Phase 1 cost-share programs will need to attend the training on Thurs-day, April 21, at 7 p.m. at the Carroll County Extension Office.

  • Asparagus is a healthy vegetable available each April

    In the next few months you will be seeing asparagus arriving on the local market. This wonderful vegetable packs in a ton of good vitamins and minerals in those stalks. Steam it, pickle it, sauté it, roast it — the possibilities are endless.

  • Public Records – April 20

    Items published in court news are public record. The News-Democrat publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published. Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to the News-Democrat do not imply guilt.

    DISTRICT COURT

  • Park vandalism prompts removal of restroom doors

    The doors are coming down and the cinder block walls are going up at the Point Park restrooms due to vandalism, Mayor Gene McMurry said in an interview Wednesday.

    Vandals have been beating the locks off of the $300 doors, making it difficult for them to last through the winter, the mayor said. He said the city is paying Carrollton resident Melvin Stewart $400 to lay the blocks, which the city already had in stock.

  • City Council briefs

    State to monitor progress
    of former Drifters site

    The Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction will be overseeing the progress of the new business at the former Drifters’ location at 207 Highland Ave., Code Enforcement Officer Art Zook told Carrollton Design and Review Monday.

    Zook currently does not have his commercial building certificate. In an interview Tuesday, he said he hopes to complete it within the next couple of months.

  • Clerks honored for donor awareness

    On April 13, Gov. Steven L. Beshear recognized the Circuit Court Clerks of Kentucky for their efforts to raise awareness about organ donation. He urged all Kentuckians to join the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry.

    “The fact is, you can be a hero. You can save a life, and not just one but many,” Beshear said.

    About 110,000 people in the United States, and more than 700 Kentuckians, are currently waiting for life-saving organ transplants. Kentucky’s Circuit Court Clerks have been active in promoting organ donation since 1992.