Today's News

  • Signs of Addiction

    SelfRefind, which is opening a clinic in Carroll County this month, has identified 10 key warning signs of opiate dependency for family members, friends and loved ones who are worried about someone taking prescription medications, such as OxyCotin, oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine or who are using heroin.

    Usage increase. As individuals become tolerant of prescription medications at the prescribed dosage, it is common for them to increase the amount of medications, indicating that the original amount is no longer providing relief.

  • Kinman withdraws plan to develop property


    The News-Democrat Intern

    Herb Kinman has withdrawn his proposed plan to develop the property bordered by Port William Lane and Schuerman Street in Carrollton.

    His proposal would have meant two duplexes and an alley would be built on the triangular piece of land.

    At the public hearing before the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission meeting Monday, July 2, Kinman asked of the eight community members assembled if they had any objections. Many of them raised their hands.

  • Repairs to Butler Lake dam keep water level low longer


    The News-Democrat Intern

    The water level at Butler Lake will stay low a little longer, according to Larry Totten, the interim manager at General Butler State Resort Park.

    Originally, the lake was partially drained to allow workmen to fix a leak in a pipe in the earthen dam on the lake’s southern end, Totten said. This is the side closest to the Kentucky River.

  • Historic election
  • Nominations sought for FSA

     Kentucky’s USDA Farm Service Agency State Executive Director John McCauley wants to remind farmers and landowners that local Farm Service Agency county committee nominations continue through Aug. 1.

    To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in a program administered by FSA, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the local administrative area in which the person is a candidate.

    To become a candidate, an eligible individual must sign the nomination form, FSA-669A.

  • Lock construction key to opening up Ky River

    By Kevin Wheatley

    The State Journal

    The gates at Lock 4 are being repaired as part of an ongoing project to reopen more than 60 miles of the Kentucky River from Frankfort to the Ohio River.

    The Kentucky River Authority is using $4 million in excess construction funds for repairs at locks 1, 2, 3 and 4 within the next two years, according to KRA Executive Director Jerry Graves.

    The project will open 64 miles of the river from Frankfort to Carrollton boat traffic, Graves said.

  • New law to protect agritourism operators, participants

     A new state law will provide Kentucky agritourism destinations with limited liability protection when it takes effect on July 11.

    The law requires venues such as wineries, orchards, and corn mazes to warn visitors that they are assuming the risk of participating in the activities of the operation. The law, filed as House Bill 440, was passed by the General Assembly and signed into law earlier this year.

  • Celebrating the Red, White and Blue
  • Renschler, Baker join to light up events with fireworks


    The News-Democrat Intern

    If you were one of the approximately four to five thousand people who turned out on the Fourth of July for fireworks, you saw John Renschler’s pyromania first hand.

    Renschler met Mark Baker in 2006, close to when Baker opened his business Freedom Fireworks.

    Since then, John has worked on firework shows for about 20 years for various companies, including Summer Blast in Somerset.

  • Cattle at risk of nitrate poisoning during extreme drought

     Due to the extreme drought conditions throughout Kentucky, it is important to be aware of nitrate poisoning that may occur as a consequence of nitrate accumulation in certain forages.  

    Nitrate concentrations tend to be higher at the base of the plants and higher in the stalks than the leaves.

    Grains, seeds and leaves do not accumulate significant nitrate levels.

    Plants with high stem-to-leaf ratios are the most likely to cause nitrate intoxication.