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Today's News

  • Study on bridge may result in lower inspection costs nationwide

    The eventual destruction of the 81-year-old Milton-Madison Bridge over the Ohio River, scheduled for next year, has presented a rare opportunity for researchers at Purdue University.

    Robert Conner, an associate professor of civil engineering at Purdue and a national expert in the study of steel fatigue, is hoping to use the bridge to compile research that will help transportation officials throughout the United States better inspect and diagnose “fracture critical” truss bridges.

  • Heroin, meth, legislation change drug landscape

    Local law enforcement agencies continue to fight the war on drugs in Carroll County. But the game is beginning to change, as new drugs hit the market and new legislation hits the books that may hinder police efforts.

    Carrollton Police Chief Mike Willhoite said police first noticed the switch from prescription drug abuse to heroin when the street cost of oxycotin and oxycodone increased to $1 per milligram, or $80 per pill.

  • Mother shares son’s overdose story

    If Aaron Dawson had been a rock star, he would be considered a member “Forever 27 Club” – in the news following the recent death of British pop star Amy Winehouse, the group is basically a list of famous musicians who have died at the age of 27 from drug overdoses.

    Aaron wasn’t famous, but his mother Kathy Dawson of Carrollton bravely stood Thursday to tell his story of addiction – and ultimate death – to those attending an event on the Courthouse lawn sponsored by Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County.

  • Back from camp: 4-Hers enjoy a ‘hot’ week of fun

    They survived. That is the 61 campers and 13 adults and teens that attended 4-H Camp last week.

    It was hot, but we had a great week and I hope that they want to go back next year. We had a great bunch of leaders at camp and three were there for the first time, Levi Underwood, Traci Morgan and Crystal Richards. The other adult leaders were Crystal Franklin, Sharon Hopkins and Kayla Stewart. Our great teen leaders were Haley Hendrick, Nikki Hill, Nicky States, Jamie Glauber, Cameron Logsdon, Conner Dermon and Taylor Hill.

  • Food preservation workshops set for August

    With all the ripe summer produce, I have been teaching food preservation workshops to help you learn proper methods of “putting up food” for those cold winter months ahead.

    Last week I concluded teaching the canning workshops.

    In August I have two more workshops scheduled — one on freezing on Tuesday, Aug. 9 and making pickles and relishes on Thursday, Aug. 18. Both of these are all-day workshops from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. A $12 fee will be charged for each workshop, which includes lunch.

  • Amick project honors Nab, Meffords

  • Carroll County Public Library - July 27, 2011

    Wednesday, July 27, Walk away the pounds, 9:30 a.m.; creative Wednesdays, teens welcome, 10 a.m.-noon; stage one drama camp, 1-4 p.m.; summer reading program picnic, 5:30 p.m.

    Thursday, July 28, Walk away the pounds, 9:30 a.m.; stage one drama camp, 1-4 p.m.

    Friday, July 29, Walk away the pounds, 9:30 a.m.; stage one drama camp, 1-4 p.m.

    Saturday, July 30, Extreme couponing, sign-up please, 10 a.m.; National Dance Day event, 10 a.m.; game day, 1-4 p.m.

    Sunday, July 31, Closed.

  • Spinach, feta cheese make great pork recipe

    I do not know about you, but I have been busy putting up pickle relish.

    I have cucumbers coming out my ears, and that is remarkable since in the past I have told you how good we are at growing zucchini. 

    I picked a cucumber the other day that must weigh three pounds.  Of course, it wasn’t used for the relish.

  • Celebrating etiquette

    Carrollton Housing Authority held a dinner to celebrate youngsters’  desire to learn etiquette, manners and proper eating techniques. The event, hosted by housing authority director Ray Clem, pictured at left standing, was held in their offices July 14. They all enjoyed a full-course meal together.

  • Pearl of great price buried deep in time of ‘me first’

    Solomon was dreaming about his new ministry as king of God’s people Israel. King David, his father, had been a most worthy leader, and Solomon wanted so much to follow in his father’s footsteps and govern well.

    This young king understood the awesome privilege and responsibility he was facing (1 Kings 3:5-9).