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Today's News

  • Matthew offers Christians a way around their worry

    In the spring of 1871, a young man picked up a book and read 21 words that changed his life.

    At the time, this man was a medical student at Montreal General Hospital.

    He was worried about final examinations. He was troubled about what he should do with his life, where he should set up his medical practice and how he would build it.

    The 21 words that changed his life were written by Thomas Carlyle. The man who was worried was William Osler, founder of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Maryland.

  • Fall is the time to think spring flowers

    After last week’s article on mulching and composting yard waste during the fall season, I suspect that your lawns and flower beds are clean as a whistle and ready for planting, right?

    Mulching and composting that yard waste will be an ongoing process during the fall, especially after the high winds we experienced this past weekend.

    The downed leaves will certainly give you plenty of mulching and composting practice.

  • Take steps to keep Halloween food items safe for children

    Keep your Halloween safe from foodborne illness with these recommendations from the Partnership for Food Safety Education:

  • Clinic focused on showing, caring for livestock

    4-H encompasses seven curriculum areas that include animal sciences, communications, family consumer sciences, health, leadership, natural resources, and SET – science, engineering and technology.

  • Public Record for Oct. 17

    Items published in court news are public record. The News-Democrat publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published. Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to the News-Democrat do not imply guilt.

    DISTRICT COURT

    The following decisions were rendered Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 10-11, in Carroll County District Court with the Hon. Elizabeth Chandler presiding.

    CIVIL

  • Over-medicated, not ready for school

    In election years, politicians often talk about children as our future.

    If that’s true — and who could argue? — two stories last week provided a Dickensian picture of Kentucky a decade hence:

    Only one in four children is ready for kindergarten, the Kentucky Board of Education reported.

  • It is everyone’s
 responsibility to keep the community safe

    Fans of “The Andy Griffith Show” often point to the episode “Citizens Arrest” as a favorite. Residents may not be making a citizen’s arrest with a new Kentucky State Police initiative, but they can help curb crime.

    A new text-tip line will allow the public to send confidential tips via cellphones.

    Here’s how it works: A cellphone user with the ability to text can dial 67283, then type KSPTIP in the message field, then leave a space before entering information about a crime or a suspect.

  • Gun falls from woman’s purse, discharges

    Customers having lunch at the Carrollton McDonald’s received quite a shock last week after a handgun fell from an Ohio woman’s purse and discharged inside the restaurant.

    Carroll County Central Dispatch received a call at 12:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, reporting that a woman fired a gun into the building at McDonald’s, according to a news release from Carrollton Police Department.

  • Lacefield named to Ghent P&Z

    The Ghent Planning and Zoning Commission appointed a new member during a brief special meeting Monday night at City Hall.

    Aaron Lacefield, owner of McCool’s Tavern on Main Cross Street, was nominated and approved by a 5-0 vote.

    “As a new businessman in town, he will be an asset to us,” said commission Chairman Karen Browning.

  • Society celebrates ‘heritage’ Saturday

    Heritage Day is this Saturday on the front lawn of the Masterson House, and Port William Historical Society President Ben Collett said it will be bigger and better than ever, with more activities, vendors and period demonstrations.

    The ultimate goal is for the event to be more of a community fall festival, Collett said Tuesday, and to become one of the organization’s major annual fund-raisers.