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Today's News

  • Byrd wins geography bee at CAC

    Christian Academy of Carrollton sixth-grader Mason Byrd won the school-level competition of the National Geographic Bee Jan. 14 and has a chance to win a $50,000 college scholarship. The school-level competition was the first round of the 26th annual National Geographic Bee.

    The bee kicked off nationwide during the week of Nov. 11, with thousands of schools around the United States and in the first U.S. territories participating. Byrd will be eligible to compete in the state bee April 4.

  • Program offers early learning opportunities for children

    The Carroll County Early Childhood Council is hosting an event Feb. 7 that will help parents, childcare providers and other caregivers better prepare children for kindergarten. The program, KinderBoost, is for three- and four-year-old children who are not currently enrolled in preschool.

    The Feb. 7 event will be held from 10–11:30 a.m. at the Carroll County Child Development Center, located next to Kathryn Winn Primary School.

  • Carroll County grad donates $20,000 to buy iPads for Winn

    Debbie Knotts Thaman presented Superintendent Lisa James and Kathryn Winn Principal Gerda Wise with a $20,000 check to be used for student iPads.  Thaman presented the check on behalf of the Thaman Family Foundation, which she and her husband Randy endow.

    “Debbie and Randy are such generous people,” Wise said.  “She grew up in Carroll County and went to school here.  It’s great to see someone give back to the community.”

  • Senators hear governor’s budget plan, eye bills on elections, abortion

    After observing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, the Legislature went back to work.

    Tuesday was a significant day as Senate President Pro Tem Katie Stine became the first female legislator to preside over the joint session of the Kentucky General Assembly, during which Gov. Steve Beshear presented his proposed budget.

    During the address, Beshear presented a multi-faceted budget proposal of $20.3 billion for the next two fiscal years. The plan calls for 5 percent cuts to most state agencies, proposes a gas tax increase and borrows $1.9 billion in new debt.

  • Governor’s budget would raises teacher salaries, boost education

    Shortly after Gov. Steve Beshear first took office in late 2007, he remarked that not only did he find the cupboard bare, it was actually gone.

    It hasn’t gotten any easier since then.  Cumulative budget cuts over the last six years have reached $1.6 billion, the state government workforce has shrunk to its smallest size in 40 years and the list of needs continues to grow faster than the revenue coming in.

  • On the road to "A" title

    Carroll beats Gallatin for first time since ‘09

    A fourth-quarter comeback lifted the Carroll County Panthers over the Gallatin County Wildcats, 57-50, in the first round of the 8th Region All “A” Classic Friday. It was the Panthers’ first win over the Wildcats since Jan. 9, 2009. 

    Carroll played a solid all-around game, shooting 43 percent from the field compared to 34 percent for the Wildcats. They dished out more assists (13-6), picked off more passes (11-4) and committed less turnovers (11-17) than Gallatin.

  • Lady Panthers get team win over Spencer County

    After nearly two weeks without playing a game, the Lady Panthers stepped up their defensive effort in the second half to come away with a 55-43 home win over Spencer County Tuesday night.

    “The tale of two halves,” head coach Paul Stone said. “The first half, our defense was OK at times, but it wasn’t good on No. 35 [senior MacKenzie Myers]. The second half, we did a much better job of doubling her on the block. She walked several times because we did a better job of that. That was the difference in the game.”

  • Extension Service offerings in February are extensive

    Local residents will have the opportunity to participate in a number of programs offered in the next few weeks by Carroll County Extension office.

    These offerings deal with topics such as health, sewing, quilting, diabetes and embroidery.

    Later in February and March, we are also planning an Extension Homemaker lesson, “Why Quilts Matter on February 18, classes in the heritage skill of huck toweling on March 4, and classes in beginning sewing, basics of cooking and baking and healthy weight management. 

  • Program set to provide training for Master Stockers

    The Carroll County Cooperative Extension Service will host the Master Stocker Program, beginning at 6:30 p.m., on Thursday, Feb. 6.

    The Master Stocker Program is a Kentucky Beef Network Program, funded by the Kentucky Agriculture Development Board, that is developed and delivered by the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

    It consists of eight 2 1/2-hour sessions focusing on background and stocker operations in Kentucky.  All sessions will be held through Micro-soft Lync at the Carroll County Exten-sion Office.

  • Billingsley pens book on Gaunt’s time here

    Some of the main players in the building of the state of Kentucky – from its grand homes and plantations to its early economy – have gone unrecognized, and former District Court Judge Stan Billingsley is looking to change that.

    In his latest book, “The Widows of Highland Avenue,” Billingsley weaves a tale that focuses on Wheeling Gaunt, born into slavery to prominent merchant Alfred Gaunt in Carroll County about 1812, the same year his white half-brother, John, was born.