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Today's News

  • Rising Above the Storm

    March 2, 2012.

    It’s been a little more than two years since the EF1 tornado swept through Carroll County and changed M.G. and Barbara Long’s lives forever.

    Their home at 2578 King’s Ridge Road in Carroll County was one of the hardest hit in the county. Almost all of the exterior walls – including the garage – and most of the roof were ripped off, and insulation and debris filled every crevice in a matter of minutes.

  • Bridge closure likely through end of March

    Preparation work continues for the main slide of the Milton-Madison Bridge, officials say, but it appears likely the bridge will remain closed through at least the end of the month.

    The sequence of events required to open the bridge will take about two or more weeks, according to a statement issued Tuesday by Doe-Anderson, the public relations firm representing the Milton-Madison Bridge Project.

  • ‘Red Dog’ leads inspections on bridge

    The bright, royal blue polo shirt was what caught the reporter’s eye during a public meeting several months ago at Madison’s Brown Gymnasium. Stitched in gold on the left breast were the words “Trimble County High School Alumni.” The wearer, sporting a bright red goatee, was an affable young man who seemingly doesn’t meet a stranger. His name is Larry “Red Dog” Collins and he has a significant responsibility with the new Milton-Madison Bridge.

  • Prestonville set to pay sewer bill early, hired mowing company

    The City of Prestonville hopes to save the city and its residents years of sewer costs by paying the remainder of the money borrowed to upgrade the sewer as early as this year.

    During the March 17 meeting, the mayor and commissioners discussed paying off the additional amount, currently about $98,000, as soon as possible.

    “It will benefit everybody in Prestonville,” Mayor Billy Walker said.  He went on to say he has been “pushing for this for a while.”

  • Heavy lifters

    Carroll County student-athletes Caleb Guenthner, Terrance Mumphrey, Ramsey Gordon, Zak Wilson and Darrien Byrd traveled to North Bullitt High School to compete in the State Push/Pull weight lifting competition. 

    Juniors Mumphrey, Guenthner and Gordon competed in the varsity division. In the 220-pound weight class, Ramsey placed fourth. Mumphrey and Guenthner were both in the 275 weight class. Mumphrey came in first place in their weight class, while Guenthner placed second. 

  • Feelin’ the need for speed
  • Stoops wants senior-led track team to meet goals

    This season’s Carroll County High School track and field team boasts a mix of state qualifiers on the high school and middle school levels, experienced athletes and new talent ready to test themselves for the first time. 

    Eighteen student-athletes signed up this season, including nine seniors: Branden Brock, Tre Burgin, Alex Burns, Cheyenne Duke, Michael Hall, Blake Kruzan, Sierra Martinez, Cody Osborne and Ashley Srouder.

  • Tough schedule will test the softball Lady Panthers, led by six seniors

    For softball seniors Michaela Culver, Sarah Hawkins, Kelsey Ogden, Mackenzie Ogden, Kayla Williamson and Brittany Yocum, 2014 is their year. This core group has been playing together since they were children and some have been starters for the Carroll County High School Lady Panthers since seventh grade. This should be the year that this team meets its full potential and makes a name for itself.

    Head coach Dennis Hawkins certainly believes in this team.

  • Lady Panthers defeat Gallatin, 3-2, in season opener Monday

    The Lady Panthers tennis team had the first-game jitters, but were still able to come away with a 3-2 win over border rival Gallatin County Monday.

    “I thought it was very rough,” head coach Juan Fernandez said. “They were very nervous.”

  • A little effort can help keep Carroll County beautiful

    As our days get warmer and our snow vanishes, we start to see fast food wrappers, soda cans, cigarette butts and plastic bags littering our roadsides, floating in creeks and even hanging from trees.

    According to a research study conducted by Keep America Beautiful, a non-profit organization devoted to community improvement, littering has decreased in the past 40 years but still continues to be a serious issue across the United States.

    The study estimated that $11.5 billion is spent each year on decreasing and clean-up activities related to litter.