• Some things never change

    Many of the best things in life are simple. Take Thanksgiving, for example. Lacking the costumes of Halloween and the parties of New Year’s, Thanksgiving requires only two ingredients: food and family. As a celebratory month, November does not need presents, egg hunts or fireworks. It is a simple thing.

  • Rand discusses Thanksgiving holiday traditions nationwide

    This week, our family and friends will gather around the dinner table as they have for generations to celebrate a holiday that is nearing its 400th anniversary.

    As even some of our youngest students can tell us, what is widely considered to be America’s first Thanksgiving took place in 1621, when the Pilgrims and a tribe of Native Americans came together for a three-day feast to give thanks for a successful harvest.

  • Watch out for banking thieves this season

    Kentucky New Era

    The holiday shopping season can make or break many retailers each year, including some in our own community, but it is also a potential bonanza for criminals who prey on busy consumers.

    It is the season of giving — and unfortunately, it is the time for taking.

  • Study finds education pays – In many more ways than one

    In the late 1990s, the state rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.”

    That popular slogan came on the heels of a landmark overhaul of our public postsecondary schools and the creation of such programs as KEES, the lottery-based college scholarships that high school students earn with good grades, and “Bucks for Brains,” which added hundreds of millions of state and private dollars to our university research budgets.

  • Exercise to beat the wintertime blues

    Seasonal Depression Order (also called SAD) is a type of depression that is triggered by the seasons of the year. Symptoms usually begin late fall and early winter. The most common type of SAD is called winter onset depression. More than a half a million Americans experience a winter depression, but are better come summer. 

    The following are common symptoms of SAD:

    • a change in appetite, especially craving sweets or starchy foods

    •  weight gain

    • drop in energy level

  • Library collecting donations to local organizations in lieu of fines

    A switch flipped on Nov. 1. It officially became the holiday season. After Halloween was over, Christmas trees were going up. It has been so prevalent in advertisements and social media that I began to have panic attacks that I was not ready. I have to remind myself that there is plenty of time to have a great holiday season. There is so much pressure on us to create the most “Pinterest-worthy” moments that we might forget to stop and enjoy the time.  

  • Carroll school district’s budget simple, solid

    Like many school systems in rural Kentucky, the Carroll County School District is one of the largest governmental organizations in its county. With more than 300 employees, four large schools, 28 buses and 1,912 students, the district educates, cooks meals, provides transportation, promotes health, trains teachers and serves as a transition point for students moving from K-12 to colleges and careers.

  • Rand outlines events upcoming for state

    While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.

    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792.  In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say; instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.

  • Veterans Day began after WWI

    On Nov. 11, our nation will come together as it has for nearly a century to pay tribute to those who have sacrificed their time, talents and even their lives and limbs to preserve our freedom.

  • Five ways to boost body’s natural growth hormone

    For the hard training athlete, growth hormone is a splendid thing. Produced naturally by the body, this hormone repairs muscle tissue, builds muscle tissue, burns fat, enhances metabolism and speeds overall recovery. It may sound too good to be true. While this hormonal fountain of youth is not without limits, there are ways you can manipulate certain aspects of training and diet to keep your natural growth hormone levels topped off night and day.