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Columns

  • CCHS, Distinguished–District, Proficient: Change in the air

    Annual test scores are in, and the results are incredible. Carroll County High School is a Distinguished School, and the Carroll County School District is a Proficient District, according to the Kentucky Department of Education’s Next-Generation Achievement testing system.

    The Carroll County School District grew from a 59.3 Annual Measurable Objective to a 66.5 from 2014-2015 to 2015-2016. Kentucky’s assessment and accountability system determines which schools and school districts are improving and which are not.

  • Civics an important lesson for students; Contact Rand for a visit

    One of the country’s most enduring challenges is making sure that our citizens, both young and old alike, have at least a basic understanding of government and the role we all play in making it work.

  • Recovery Walk a new event sponsored by Carroll Co. Champions
  • Consider making an ‘old school classic’ for your next meal

    Hello once again, my friends. As I sit here typing, fall is in the air, the leaves are changing and cool weather is upon us. Alright, I’m kidding. Fall should be upon us, but instead it’s hot, the leaves are still green and, other than the occasional pumpkin sitting on the shelf, it’s not even feeling like fall. Oh well, the time will come when it does and I’m sure that it is coming soon.

  • State works to preserve its natural habitat

    For hundreds of thousands of Kentuckians and out-of-state visitors, there is no place quite like the commonwealth when it comes to hunting, fishing or just experiencing all that nature has to offer.

    In a given year, more than 550,000 people fish, 347,000 hunt and another two million either boat on our rivers and lakes or observe our wildlife. Not surprisingly, these outdoor activities are a major driver of our economy, with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources estimating the annual impact at nearly $6 billion.

  • Federal Reserve audit

    Congressional committees are jokingly referred to as the place where bills go to die. However, I’m happy to report that my bipartisan bill to audit the Federal Reserve passed the House Oversight and Government Reform committee by unanimous consent this summer, and is now eligible to come before the full House for a vote. Since 90% of bills die in committee, you could say that my legislation had a near-death experience, but that’s a good thing.

  • UK’s assault on open government

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    President Eli Capilouto’s insistence that the University of Kentucky must sue its student newspaper to protect sexual abuse victims from unwanted public exposure may be sincere but it flunks Reality 101.

    Meanwhile, UK’s flouting of the Kentucky Open Records Act in this and too many instances is damaging the university’s reputation and undermining public trust in Kentucky’s academic flagship.

  • Unique variety of festivals are held in Kentucky every autumn

    If there is one theme binding the numerous festivals that take place across the commonwealth each year, it’s that if we raise it, grow it or use a lot of it, there’s almost certainly a community that celebrates it.

    Most of these festivals take place over a 10-week period that begins in late August and runs through Halloween, and food is often the focal point.  During that time, you can find events dedicated to apples, chicken, country ham, sorghum, bourbon, honey, barbecue and even salt.

  • Retirement leaves AG office less equipped to deal with open meetings, open records

    Editor’s note: The article referenced in this column, “Kentucky’s Open Records Law: Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Open Government,” is on page 3.

    Amye Bensenhaver likes to talk. There’s no denying that. She’s talks fast, too, like she’s afraid she won’t be able to give you all the information she has before the next question comes. And Amye has a lot of information.

    That is, of course, why I called her.

  • Rand reflects on how Kentuckians were involved in the 9/11 tragedy

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: 9/11.

    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news.  It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.